Director, Producer, Trailblazer: Ida Lupino

In the 1940s and ’50s, in what is considered by many to be the “golden age” of the film industry, few women were working behind the scenes. They could be seen on screen, usually portraying polarized female stereotypes: the virgin and the whore, the good girl and the villain, the love interest and the mother. Behind-the-scenes positions for women virtually disappeared after WWII, coinciding with the societal shift to focus on the nuclear family and feminine ideals. Any role that did exist were always given to white women — women of colour, if they appeared on screen, were generally only given roles that either cast them as servants or fetishized them. That’s an issue that’s still being addressed today. When it comes to contemporary female directors, we are finally seeing support and recognition for their works, but we are only still at the very beginning.

It was the same in the 1940s as it is now: in order to see the stories they want to see, women needed to make the movies themselves.

Ida Lupino did just this. In the 1940s, she was a big ticket actress, working alongside high-profile actors like Humphrey Bogart. She was top-billed, talented, and beautiful, but she wasn’t finished. She wanted to make movies. While on the set, she would watch the directors and the camera operators and learn from them, probably one of the best education a young filmmaker could ever get. While she was always a student of film, Lupino didn’t get a chance to direct until she sat in for director Elmer Clifton for the 1949 film Not Wanted when Clifton fell ill. Lupino was not credited, but it was her first unofficial project.

Ida Lupino. Photo via TIFF on Twitter.

In 1950 she opened her own production company with her husband, Collier Young. There, she wrote, directed, and distributed a number of films without studio backing and without famous actors. These were films with strong female characters, complicated women, women on the outside of society. Her topics were controversial for the time — sexual assault, unplanned pregnancy, and mental health to name a few —, and even now, despite more open dialogues on these topics, the stories Lupino told and the films she created are still very relevant.

“She’s a humanist,” says Anne Morra, Associate Curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. “She doesn’t pack her films with known movie stars, so the audience has a character without a story attached to them. Her films could be documentaries.”

In her official directional debut, Never Fear, the subjects are professional dancers and lovers with Carol and Guy at its center. Carol contracts polio and loses the ability to dance, causing feelings of worthlessness and inferiority. In Outrage, Lupino tackles sexual assault, depicting a violent attack on a young woman and the subsequent emotional fallout and police investigation.

A still from Outrage (1950). Source.

These are topics that big production companies would never touch since the box office payoff would have been minimal at best. Who would want to see such terrible and unromantic things? Generally, films at the time were much more formulaic, falling under romance or crime. Think of the noir thrillers from the 1940s and the romantic comedies of the 1950s. The main characters are cool, competent men and the women are seductive, soft speaking side pieces. Lupino’s realistic, female-driven narratives were hardly what audiences at the time were used to consuming.

“She’s quite avant-garde in her role,” says Morra. “She learned from other directors but it’s important not to compare her because her works are very unique.”

Despite not fitting in with her contemporaries, Lupino’s works have staying power. This month, TIFF is hosting Lupino’s first-ever retrospective, showing a restored selection of her works as a director and an actress. Morra, who has done extensive research on Lupino, introduced the screening of Never Fear last Wednesday at the Bell Lightbox. The retrospective celebrates Lupino as both a pioneer for women on screen and in independent filmmaking.

“I hope [viewers] take away the idea of Ida as a revolutionary filmmaker. She was a woman working without a blueprint,” says Morra. “I hope they’re able to rediscover her or discover her for the first time.”

As someone who wasn’t very familiar with Lupino, I discovered her for the first time through Outrage, a movie that tore me up emotionally but impressed me with how it handled a story of sexual assault, arguably better, despite some religious overtones, than some television shows aim to depict it now. I was surprised by it, shocked by it, and thrilled to have discovered such a strong point of view from a female director. We now have many more female perspectives. We have Ava DuVernay, Ana Lily Amirpour, Jennifer Kent, and Kathryn Bigelow, all talented filmmakers with distinct perspectives and styles. It doesn’t make sense to compare them with one another, just as it doesn’t make sense to compare them with Lupino, who worked in a very different time and industry. What cannot be denied is Lupino’s effect on cinema, her legacy of a phenomenal body of work and the ground she broke in her time.

As Morra put it, “She’s someone who deserves to be seen.”

Tickets to Ida Lupino’s retrospective can be found here. The retrospective runs through September 2nd. Continue following our arts & culture coverage on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Long Story Short: 7 Questions with a Short Story Author

Hot on the heels of the release of her first short story collection Moving Parts, Toronto author Lana Pesch maps out the movements that led her here

Toronto-based author Lana Pesch
Toronto-based author Lana Pesch

Q: What sparked the concept for this collection?

A: To be honest, I wasn’t really focused on a collection. I was just writing stories, and they started to add up. I worked closely with [Scotiabank Giller Prize nominee] Sarah Selecky. I was like, “Okay, I have 10 stories here and I don’t know what to do with them,” and she said, “What we have here is the making of a collection.” So I worked with her to hone them down.

Q: Moving Parts “draws back the curtain on what it means to be human.” This may be asking for a spoiler, but what does being human mean to you?

A: I think primarily the flawed part of us, and the failures, and what is learned by failing. I’ve failed numerous times repeatedly — and keep doing so — and I think it’s really healthy. A lot of people see that failing is a bad thing, but I really don’t.

Q: Care to share a failure or two of your own?

A: My first marriage, probably, there’s one [laughs]. Not that I regret it, but it ended in divorce, so that’s how that story goes. I’m not entirely sure the job that I’m in currently was a wise choice. Financially I’ve made some poor choices, took up skydiving as a hobby. But there are pros and cons to everything, right?

“Moving Parts,” Lana Pesch’s first collection of short stories

 

Q: You’ve compared skydiving to writing, saying they both require courage, trust, discipline. You also have a history in theatre, and one could draw the same parallels there.

A: Yeah. In theatre especially, it’s a very vulnerable thing to do. I haven’t done it in years, and god, I’m much more comfortable jumping out of an aircraft than standing up in front of an audience. Isn’t public speaking the most feared thing? That and the dentist or something? But yeah, definitely parallels there, with the courage, confidence and trust in your own ability. That’s what writing is, too.

Q: You’re a traveler. How have your adventures impacted your writing?

A: The travel does definitely colour the writing. I think it’s a great tool to have those experiences, [to] just remember colours, food, a place, rooms. Somewhere, sometime, they can be the initial start that grows.

A: Do you feel you’re working towards or against traditional CanLit?

Lisa Moore wrote a great article in [the] Walrus about a new wave of CanLit short story writers, people that are going against the grain, and I would put myself in that camp. I guess it’s just being a bit more edgy, a bit more unapologetic.

Q: What does being unapologetic mean to you?

A: I’m not sugar coating anything, I’m not shying away from difficult subjects that I’m curious about. It’s not always a happy ending, but I always try and get some comedy in there, because I find that’s one of my own coping mechanisms for dealing with things that are difficult. I think it’s part of the balance of life.