Accessories Trend Report Spring 2018: Next Season’s Most Coveted Items!

Next season’s accessories came with a fun surprise! Colours, patterns, and textures dominated the accessories game on the runway. Differing from the norm, accessories told their own story this season. You could almost say that this season’s group of bags, jewels, hats, and shoe could easily be stand-alone collections in and of themselves. Able to carry out a cohesive and impressive story all on their own.

The Printed Pop Bag

Printed bags had the biggest impact on the runway for Spring. Prints, florals, and plaids all came crashing onto many of the worlds biggest brand’s accessories. Transforming the functional bag into an outstanding showpiece that could pump up any outfit in your closet. Milan seemed to take the trend to the most extreme by putting jarring patterns on simplistic bags. Giving a graphic edge to standard silhouettes. At Prada, bags were strewn with graphic comic strip style prints that took gave each bag its own unique story. Adding a special element to each purse that walked the runway. Over at Marni, adorable square bags were splashed with bright plaids. Creating an interesting, almost vintage take on the modern box bag. Paris seemed to prefer a more subtle take on the printed bag. Opting for more elegantly and less graphic prints than Milan did. At Valentino, models walked the runway in the brand’s staple rockstud bags. However, the bag seemed to be painted with gorgeous floral motifs. Giving the bag a double identity, soft vs hard, elegant, yet edgy.

The Peek-a-boo See-through Shoe

This season’s footwear took a surprisingly fun turn for spring. Last season’s love for the chunky heel continued as expected, however, this season’s chunky heel came with an unexpected translucent friend. For Spring, Parisian fashion houses Chanel and Balmain both put their models in interesting and super clear cap toes PVC boots. The boots themselves have an air rain time high fashion chic about them, but they’re grounded with the strong pops of neutral black and white. Giving the boots a more elegant, rather than childish look. Over in New York, Prabal Gurung sported an interesting pair of mules that used a sheer mesh and clear heel combo, rather than using PVC. Giving the shoe a more reasonable and breathable appeal for the summer.

The Epic Chandelier Earring

Chandelier earrings may have become passe in the last decade. However, the glimmering throwbacks are back in a big way! In Paris and Milan, oversized earrings packed a very big punch. At Saint Laurent, giant jewelled chandeliers took on a mod feel with big rectangular sparklers, making the earing look more like bedazzled frames ready to frame a royal masterpiece. Over in Milan, both Dolce & Gabanna and Gucci used pearls, gold, and gems to create a modern take on Renaissance royalty, giving Elizabeth the 1st a run for her money.

The Theatrical Straw Hat

This season’s straw summer hat get an exciting upgrade. What started with Gucci’s huge sunhat and Jacquemus Provencal hats has grown into one of the biggest and most interesting accessory trends of the season. At Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood, the straw hat took a more vagabond like look aesthetic. Resembling something more cartoonish, which fits in perfectly with the outlandish and forward thinking appeal that’s been associated with Westwood for years. At Jacquemus, the straw sunhat took on its most extreme form yet. With proportions resembling something straight out of a French romance movie. The romantic movement of the hat perfectly mirrored the sensual feel of the collection. Over in Milano, Missoni caught wind of the trend and added its 0wn interesting flair. Creating a more windswept and cutting-edge sunhat that screams Missoni.

 

Milan & Paris fall 2017 trend report!

Trends are often hard to mimic, (and even harder to distinguish from one season to another these days) which has always been a drag. Fortunately for all of us, this season’s Paris and Milan fall 2017 shows have brought out what are some of the best (and most wearable) trends in fashion for a very long time. There is something trending on the runway this season that almost anyone can get into, which is really something to be excited about. Whether your personal taste revolves around wearing sweet pastels or sharply refined shoulders, Paris and Milan had you covered with a plethora of pieces geared perfectly to fit your favourite look. Here are Novella’s favourite trends from Paris and Milan fall/winter 2017!

Metallic Sheen

Photos: Vogue Runway | From L to R: Dries Van Noten, Louis Vuitton, Max Mara

Metallic’s popped back into style this season once again, with various designers opting to showcase looks that shone just as bright as the spotlights that bathed the runway. But this season’s metallic hues came with a twist. Rather than going for the traditional gold, silver, and copper. Designers instead chose to use fabrics that used fabrics that not only had interesting colours choices, they also gleamed with a silvery sheen that added a youthful spark to every look. For example, Dries Van Noten chose to showcase oil slick metallics instead of the traditional metallic colour choices to add a chic and modern twist to his throwback collection.

Navy Blue

Photos: Vogue Runway | From L to R: Christian Dior, Chanel, Aquiliano. Rimondi

Not very many colours can provide you with the elegance and freshness that navy blue does. Luckily, designer’s this season were busy getting inspired by the countless various of midnight blue there are in the world. Collection after collection sprang up in Milan and Paris showcasing the regal colour in all of its dark sapphire beauty. At Chanel and Dior, classic silhouettes were constructed in navy fabrics to give the outfits a crisp and clean look that transitions perfectly with between spring/summer nights and fall/winter days. One great way to pull off the perfect navy outfit is to pair it with a crisp white grounding piece like a white buttoned down shirt or a white turtleneck and beret.

Black Leather / Vinyl

Photos: Vogue Runway | From L to R: Saint Laurent, Hermes, Haider Ackermann

Black leather and vinyl dominated the runway on this season’s Milan and Paris runways, giving hardcore 80’s fans and excuse to rock those vintage leather pieces they’ve been hiding away in the back of their closets. Houses like Saint Laurent and Hermes relied on the full 80’s rundown to create the perfect all black leather and vinyl looks, while Haider Ackermann chose to create a leather look that more closely resembled a high-speed motorcycle chase outfit Trinity would have worn in the matrix. Now leather may seem like a daunting material to wear. But the look doesn’t necessarily have to look exactly as it does on the runway for you to achieve this at home. A simple faux leather outfit and leather pant with a band shirt or bright coloured dress shirt can create the perfect throwback look for your wardrobe this fall.

Pastels

Photos: Vogue Runway | From L to R: Miu Miu, Gucci, Alberta Ferretti

Pastels have always been a staple of spring fashion no matter what city you go to. But fashion movers and shakers around the world have felt that some rearranging had to be done in recent years. Thus, we now have the ability to wear whatever we’d like during whatever time of the season. This spells good news for brands like Gucci, who’s eccentric patterns and colours help the brand hark back to a different time where fashion seemed so effortlessly quirky and chic. At Alberta Ferretti, pastels took a more regal appearance in the form of paintings by various famed artists. This ethereal take on pastels conjures up images of the Rococo, a time period where pastels were used for everything from room paint, to ladies ball gowns.

The 80’s

Photos: Vogue Runway | From L to R: Mugler, Moschino, Stella McCartney

The 1980’s are one of those time periods that is constantly coming back into fashion in one way or another. This season, it seems that designers are strongly leaning towards gaudy prints and elongated shoulders to create the perfect 80’s silhouette. At Moschino, party dresses were made using a fabric whose print looked like the decorated school notebooks of an 80’s high school student, while Mugler and Stella McCartney chose to express their love for the 80’s through the use of statement shoulders a la Dame Joan Collins in Dynasty. Unfortunately, hardcore 80’s inspired looks aren’t the easiest to wear day to day (and are often times highly unrecommended to wear during the day) but fret not. You can still rock the 80’s trend by taking the most lavish and extravagant 80’s inspired looks to the club or a fancy party; just to turn heads.

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Novella Team Selects Their Favourite Looks From The F/W ’17 Collections

Fashion is a defining trait of our individuality. It allows us to express what we as humans feel on the inside, on the outside. Fashion has a way of changing out moods for the better and for the worst; in the same way, a beautiful dress can make you unimaginably beautiful but the wrong fit or colour could turn a dream into a nightmare. But that’s all easily fixed by throwing on your favourite sweater or pair of jeans.

If you’re anything like us here at Novella, you’ll know that style changes just as fast as a person’s day can. Luckily this season’s collections didn’t hold back on giving us new looks and styles to help transform and change ourselves into whatever and whomever we want to be. Here are some picks from the Novella team’s favourite fall/winter 2017 collections.

Drew Brown, Editor-in-Chief

Photo Credit: Vogue Runway. L to R Burberry, Gucci. Neil Barrett, Acne Studios

Burberry

For his second See now, buy now collection for Burberry, Christopher Bailey drew inspiration from British sculptor Henry Moore. Bailey’s asymmetrical cut cable knit sweaters for both women and men were definite standouts from the collection.

Gucci

Love it or hate it, Alessandro Michele’s new Gucci continues to not disappoint. Yes, on the runway the looks can seem a bit severe, however, picked apart there is something in the collection for everyone. This coat reminds me of a coat my mom wore back in the 70s which had an astrakhan collar. I would secretly put on my mom’s coat to play dress up. My love for fashion started at a young age and Gucci’s F/W ’17 brought back great memories.

Neil Barrett

Keeping with nostalgia theme, designer Neil Barrett drew inspiration from 80s music from The Cure, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Echo and the Bunnymen which was the soundtrack to youth. The collection was filled with precision tailoring and leather jackets that paid homage to the era but still modern for today. What I love most of the about this look and everything from the collection, Barrett has a way of creating chic menswear that allows the person wearing the clothes to appear effortless but still look well put together.

Acne Studios 

Looking back at all the collections, there were a lot completely wearable clothes sent down the runway and less over-the-top experimentation. With the constant musical chairs taken place at the major houses and the current political climate, this was not necessarily a bad thing. For fall, Acne Studios focused on menswear wardrobe staples and played with proportions.  I picked a more slim look from the collection and I could I totally see my rocking this outfit to any event.

Chris Zaghi, Fashion Editor

Photo Credit: Vogue Runway | From L to R: Cedric Charlier, Palmiers Du Mal, Who Is It?, Walter Van Beirendonck

Cedric Charlier

If anyone has ever met me personally, they’ll know exactly how much I love powder blue. Every time I see the colour, I’m transported to an alien world of white fluffy clouds, clear skies, a warm breeze, and a bed of powder blue flowers all around me. So you can image my utter delight when I laid my eyes on this head to toe powder blue outfit. It looks bright, comfy, and light as air. And the edition of the bright peek of lemon yellow adds that tiny break in colour that the outfit needs to come together.

Palmiers Du Mal

I’ve never been one to enjoy formal wear. Just the thought of having to wear a blazer, or worse, a full suit, makes me cringe. Luckily men’s fashion is changing in such a way that what once deemed unfit for a more formal occasion, can now be worn as an alternative to the suit. At Palmiers Du Mal, a summery alternative to the traditional suit is presented in the form of a relaxed pant and a silky-velvety single buttoned shirt that has all the flair of a wealthy South American millionaire, without the hassle of a tight pant and blazer.

Who Is It?

One of the greatest joys of working in the fashion industry is the plethora of different places you can find extremely well-made garments that suit anyone’s personal style. A perfect example of this is Who Is It? a brand that hails all the way from Ukraine, making it’s at Kiev Fashion week. Now some may think it’s a bit ridiculous to stray so far from the fashion capitals to find something to wear, but that’s where I see the beauty of it all, the beauty of finding something special in a place you’d least expect it. Another reason why I chose an outfit from Who Is It? comes down to the fact that I’ve just never really been one to lean towards dressing myself in a pristine fashion. I like my clothing to be a little light-hearted and casual, and that’s exactly what Who Is It? gives their customers. A slightly kitschy take on today’s trends.

Walter Van Beirendonck

Now, this is no way the most wearable piece of clothing, but just take a moment to look at it. Take it all in. The scarf, the hat, the suit, the giant hands. The entire thing makes absolutely zero sense, but that’s the beauty of it! Wearing this would be like wearing a surrealist painting. Dali and Magritte would be so proud of me as I walked down the street swinging my massive fabric hands around willy-nilly.

Natasha Grodzinski, Contributing Writer

Photo credit: Vogue Runway. L to R: Area, Roksanda, Gucci, Nina Ricci

Area

Area first came on my radar back in 2016, when their Pre-Fall campaign for that year was released. The campaign, shot by Charlotte Wales, featured soft lighting with highlighted sheen on jewel detailing. It was glam, and it was all over the Twitter. Since then, I’ve looked forward to seeing what Piotrek Panszczyk and Beckett Fogg put out under the brand. Their use of vintage silhouettes with elegant touches makes them a favourite in my books, and I adored their F/W ’17 collection. These are the type of clothes I wish I could wear all the time.

Roksanda

In all honesty, I haven’t paid too much attention towards Roksanda in the past, most likely because I usually find myself been in a Burberry-induced haze. Their recent collection, however, really grabbed my attention. I liked nearly every look they sent down the runway, particularly with how Ilincic used voluminous shapes and draping to create the ultimate cold-weather looks. I had a difficult time picking a favourite design from the collection but finally decided on this one, mainly because I want that coat so badly.

Gucci

I can’t really talk about the fall collections without talking about Gucci. We’re living in a Gucci world where the brand has found a resurgence in popularity and is a favourite amongst almost everyone I’ve talked to about their current favourite houses. Their F/W ’17 collection was quite interesting – to me, it felt almost like a “Gucci meta” collection. The self-awareness of the designs showed a play on consumer expectations and over-the-top patterning and accessorising. The show itself was such a spectacle of fashion and so weird that I barely remember what the venue looked like, or who saw in the front row. This look, in particular, stuck out in my mind, with the playful combination of colours and use of the classic Gucci tee, which we now see coming back into popularity in a huge way.

Nina Ricci

Nina Ricci’s collection was probably one of my favourites from PFW. It was so beautifully done, so well styled and had that Europe-in-Autumn romance vibe that is a bit difficult to articulate, but so easy to recognize when it is seen. I loved the use of colour and the clean tailoring done on the jackets and trousers. The point I’m trying to get at is I want everything from this collection, so if anyone from Nina Ricci is reading this, please hook ya girl up.

Claire Ball, Editorial Contributor

Photo Credit: Vogue Runway. L to R Yeezy, Balmain, Saint Laurent, Moschino.

One of my favourite ready-to-wear looks from this season was of course in the Yeezy Season 5 collection… shocker! Everyone knows I am a tomboy at heart. I am always drawn to boyish style like hoodies and baseball hats. I have never been much of a girly girl in my style, and this look made all my childhood tomboy dreams come true. The sweatshirt and hat with the hunting camo patterned pants and boots give me all the feels. I really identify with the tomboy look that the Yeezy collections always pull off so well. Yeezy always gets me.

The Balmain collection really stood out to me. The theme seemed to revolve around wild animals. There was a lot of animal prints and textures, as well as a lot of strong colours and shapes that together produced a sort of animal kingdom on the runway. One of my favourite looks pulled together a vintage looking wolf t-shirt layered over top of a long sleeved camo-style shirt and paired with a mini skirt and super-high boots.

This Saint Laurent was probably one of my favourites this season. The collection brought the sass to the runway. Designer Anthony Vaccarello’s sophomore show was a collection of my after-dark wardrobe dreams. All of the black velvet, shiny dark leather, deep v-necks and strong shoulders are what makes this collection feel dangerous. It’s strongly feminine without being overly romantic. I just love YSL.

I oddly fell in love with the mail packaging look Jeremy Scott gave the Moschino collection this season in Milan. Cardboard camel colour with packaging logos, stamps, and shipping tape really intrigued me. The reduce, reuse, recycle message was a different take on the logo-mania that has been infiltrating the runways. Nevertheless, Jeremy Scott has somehow found a way to make UPS delivery boxes simultaneously witty and chic.

Liat Neuman, Fashion Contributor

Photos: Vogue Runway

Loewe

One of my favourite looks is the patchwork dress from Loewe FW17 collection. The designer knows exactly how to express femininity in a retro-contemporary kind of wayThere is something extraordinary and sophisticated, yet defiantly wearable about this maxi shift dress. The relaxed silhouette along with the earthy hue and the matching mustard bag, evoke a modern feminine look with a touch of vintage feel.

Stella McCartney

The designer knows how to juggling between masculinity and femininity elements. Here is my favourite piece from FW17. I adore the retro conical bras underneath the structure top and the high waisted oversized pants. The sharp tailoring against the relaxed fit button delivers a strong message of confidence yet sexy femininity.

Proenza Schouler

The collection gives a whole new meaning to ‘Minimalist Elegance ‘. The abstract prints, the one sleeved that expose a bare arm and the mixed of textures, there is no denial that daring and minimalism can go hand by hand and complete each other perfectly and create this bold approach.

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Is Haute Couture Still Relevant?

Is haute couture still relevant? That’s the question many fashion industry heavyweights have been asking as of late. As a flurry of rising fast fashion powerhouses, online shopping and now the emergence of see now buy now collections become a major trend within the industry, Parisian haute couture has been seeing a slow decline in customer interest and even industry interest. With many iconic houses opting to shut down their haute couture operations and others only being kept on the official schedule out of good grace and respect. Many believe that the iconic couture industry will, sooner that later, die out. But there’s an underlying question that can help answer the big question in regards to the current state of haute couture, and that’s why. Why is haute couture in such jeopardy of becoming the next big fashion faux pas?

Mme Jeanne Lanvin fitting a model photo from Style Magazine

To start, the biggest factor that’s come to affect couture is most definitely the rise of pret-a-porter. For the better part of human history, most clothing was either handmade or at least sewn on a machine but made to fit the customer like a glove. The idea of ready to wear collections that came in standard sizes was unheard of. Whether a person was young or old, rich or poor, someone was most likely making clothing meant to fit their specific measurements. That was truly the essence of haute couture. Whether a garment required the diligently trained hand of a master couturier to sew pearls into a silk bodice for an aristocratic woman or the caring hand of a mother making a dress for her child, couture had a way of coming into anyone’s home. Now some may argue that true couture started in the ateliers of Belle Epoque masters like Madame Lanvin and Monsieur Patou, but couture has truly been around for centuries, from the togas fashioned by the Greeks long ago, to the panniered gowns of the French court. Couture has been present throughout human history for ages.

Models backstage at Christian Dior Haute Couture ss12 Photo by GoRunway

So why put all that wonderful history to waste in favour of ready made garments. It comes down to cost. Historically, haute couture has been attributed to the rich upper echelon of the world and as the human population began to grow and go through revolutions in business, trade, and technology. The need for previous industries to quicken their production speed and product output was essential, causing the first real blow to haute couture. As time went on people forgot about the idea of handmade clothing and began to equate it with something only out of touch old money and nouveau riche people cared for. From then on the fashion industry began to grow into a commercialized form of revenue. Iconic houses like Pierre Balmain and Christian Dior had no choice but to begin incorporating pret-a-porter collections after designers like Yves Saint Laurent hit massive success in the market when he introduced his first ready to wear collection.

Christian Dior fitting a model Photo by Keystone/Getty Images

Another main reason why the fashion community has slowly lost interest in haute couture is due to the sterilization of individual style within the industry itself. As trends become the norm, luxury fashion houses are forced to create collections based on the year’s biggest trends as opposed to collections based on innovation and creativity. For example, the legendary house of Christian Lacroix dominated the world of fashion from the late 80’s up until its final collection in 2009. However, even though Lacroix was one of the most iconic and innovative designers for his time, his brand failed to ever turn any profit and was ultimately forced to close its doors due to massive debts and waning public interest. Likewise, design houses like Ungaro, Hanae Mori, and most recently Saint Laurent, have all halted their production of haute couture due to the massive expense it takes to create and the lack of clientele to justify its production.

A look from Christian Lacroix’s Haute Couture ss09 collection Photo by Marcio Madeira

With all that said, it seems that the future couture has been decided. With its slow but relentless decline in popularity and need, in a few years, couture may become completely obsolete. This, in turn, brings the argument back to its initial question, is haute couture still relevant? And the answer is yes. Couture should undoubtedly still be considered relevant. In an industry that’s become so obsessed with profit as opposed to artistic expression, wouldn’t it be important to keep something that showcases the art behind fashion? Rather than pumping out uniformity all year around, couture should be preserved alongside ready-to-wear to keep the craftsmanship and artistry alive. Like Simon Porte Jacquemus said, “I would like to see more poetry, less industry; because fashion is nothing without poetry.” Another very important reason to keep haute couture alive is for the sake of the seamstresses, tailors, and ateliers that devote their lives to perfecting their craft. Since couture must be made by hand, there are hundreds of ateliers working in various couture houses which carry the knowledge and the expertise to create extravagant creations that cannot be duplicated by a machine. Putting these valued and respected team members out of work would be a grave injustice to them and a grave injustice to the fashion industry as a whole. If the fashion industry rids itself of couture and the experts who make it possible, a piece of valuable knowledge would be lost for future generations. Who would be there to teach aspiring couturiers their secrets? Who will be there to uphold the artistry and standards that legends like Christian Dior and Cristobal Balenciaga created decades ago? Who will be there to take our wildest dreams and bring them to life?

A look from Giambattista Valli’s Haute Couture fw16 collection Photo by Alessandro Garofalo

In the end, questioning the relevance of haute couture is question fashion itself. Without couture, fashion itself becomes irrelevant. The storytelling becomes irrelevant. Without couture, the fashion industry becomes just another industrial engine, pumping out factory made clothing that doesn’t represent anything other than profit and uniformity.

Bands Spotted: January Edition

Good music can make gray slush, such as the road situation today, seem okay. Even sort of nice in a picturesque way. At least while the song lasts, which is to say, we need a lot of music. So when we wanted new music and have already exhausted — or have become exhausted with — Spotify’s clingy know-it-all algorithm, we turned to our contributor Tatyana to hold us down like a good old mixtape used to. Lo and behold, with mathematic precision unbeknownst to apps, she gave us music we didn’t know we needed.

Ace Tee

Rising songstress, Ace Tee’s, new video for her track, Bist Du Down? is giving people a serious case of nostalgia. Hailing from Hamburg, Germany, the singer looks and sounds like she walked right off of a R&B video from the 90’s. Bist Du Down? translates to ‘are you down?’ Yes. Yes, we are.

Marie Davidson

Marie Davidson’s live performances are really something special. With tables full of machines, spoken poetry in English and French, and expressive features, she has no problem captivating an entire room. As one half of the Montreal’s Essaie Pas, Davidson’s heavy synths and drum beats make for some very moody dance music. Her latest solo effort, Adieux Au Dancefloor (Farewell to the Dance floor), is a testament to her morbid fascination with club culture.

Le Couleur

Quebecois trio, Le Couleur, recently released their album, P.O.P. Band members, Laurence Giroux-Do, Patrick Gosselin, and Steeven Chouinard, make 80’s informed disco for you to get down to and their single off the album, L’Amour le Jour, is no exception. French lyrics have a way of making songs a million times better than their English counterparts.

Saint-Laurent

Saint-Laurent made Calvin Harris and Rihanna’s “This is What You Came For” listenable. This ‘80s power ballad is amazing.

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