Must-Have Pieces Every Guy Needs For Fall

With fall just around the corner, everyone will begin the transition from summer wardrobes to their fall/winter wardrobes. When it comes to women’s clothing for fall, the transition tends to be a lot easier than it is for men’s. Often, men’s wardrobe options for fall are just an uninspired extension of the trends offered for spring/summer. However, menswear designers have taken hold of the industry and have begun to produce collections that differ and better represent each season.

Here at Novella, we value the beauty and importance of seasonal change. And to help our male readers out, here’s a list of the must have menswear pieces for fall.

The Reworked Denim Jacket

It’s no surprise that denim has been a go-to in fashion for a few seasons now, but it wasn’t until last season that denim truly exploded on the scene. This fall, denim is in full force and finding the perfect denim jacket is exactly what every fashionable guy in the city needs. But simply choosing a regular denim jacket isn’t enough this time around. This season calls for a denim jacket that is equal parts classic and out of this world. Look for tassels, motorcycle silhouettes, two-tone colours, patches, and exaggerated tears.

The Graphic Pullover

Although it’s been around for quite some time, the graphic pull over crew-neck has become one of the most profitable and in-demand garments in the fashion world today. Now crewnecks may not be the pinnacle fashion in their original state, but if you find the perfect graphic crew-neck, make sure it has something extremely high fashion woven into its design. Look for either sleek art school chic designs, oversized athletic silhouettes, or elongated and exaggerated sleeves.

The Punk Rock Trouser

Punk rock has been at the heart of fashion since its birth back in the ’70s. However, this season’s punk pieces seem to have focused on everything below the waist. Rather than creating a head to toe look, this season calls for punk rock bottoms above all, with countless brand emulating the severity and cacophonous nature of authentic punk rock clothing. To pull the look off right, look for pants with harsh colour combinations, heavy patchwork, plaids, leather and faux leather, and extreme wear and tear.

The Double Breast

Once thought to be severely out of style, the double breasted blazer and coat are once again back in style and as in demand as ever. Having been injected with a fresh dose of modern flare, the new double breasted garment aims to add a relaxed and vintage aspect to men’s everyday suiting and tailoring. However, it’s best to not trust this look if it’s a little too vintage looking. You may end up looking passé, rather than modern and in the now. When attempting this look, make sure to look for trendy and modern materials, boxier and more relaxed silhouettes, severe shoulders, and pop colours to avoid looking like the chorus line of Guys and Dolls.

The Quilted Puffer

It comes as no surprise that puffer jackets have once again come back into style for another season. However, this time around, the puffer jacket has transformed from its oversized and overstuffed debut to a leaner and thinner version of its former self. Instead of embracing the former ’90s puffer style jackets, designers are now opting for thinner quilted puffers that fit tighter to the body and offer more modern shapes. Instead of a voluminous, oversized puffer, opt for one that’s either cropped or waist length, double breasted, a caplet, a blazer, or features and avant-garde silhouette to avoid weighing down your look.

Continue following our fashion and lifestyle coverage on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

The best of Paris Men’s Fashion Week

Men’s fashion weeks around the world sometimes get a bad wrap as being mere fillers used to hold the fashion market between the ladies’ shows, which, to some extent, is true. With fashion being a predominantly female-focused industry, designers sometimes ended up creating menswear as a quick fix to engender male buyers’ interest in the brand. The result: lackluster and uninspired collections that really had nothing to do with the brand apart from carrying its name on the label. However, it seems as though many designers are finally understanding the power that a solid menswear line can have. Every season, it seems that more and more designers are popping up on the men’s week schedules, all with their own styles, twists, and innovative designs aimed at changing the face of menswear around the world.

Thom Browne

Photos: Vogue Runway

It looks as if the biggest trend this season is genderless clothing, the mixing and matching of men’s and women’s to create a new range of clothing that fit the term “humanwear” rather than menswear. At Thom Browne, the air was heavy with the idea of gender non-conformity. What was once seen as women’s clothing was quickly turned into a collection of genderless formal wear, at once crisp and heavily based on traditional tropes of masculinity, but also made soft and feminine through the use of tailoring and length. Thom Browne created a double image, almost like two images placed on top of one another. It isn’t either or, it’s about humanity and its similarities rather what makes what gender what.

Dior Homme

Photos: Vogue Runway

Now it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the spring collections are riddled with shorts. The whole point of a spring collection is to provide the customers with a seasonally appropriate outfit as the weather starts to warm up. However, it seems that, over the past few seasons, men’s shorts seemed to have been getting shorter and shorter. This is most likely due to the fact that menswear is only very rarely affected by the rules of masculinity and femininity. So it wasn’t in the least bit shocking to see designer Kris Van Ashe send out a flurry of cropped hems on the runway at Dior Homme. The beauty in this collection comes from the casualness of the shorts. Instead of creating a traditionally formal look for menswear, it creates a much more youthful and carefree silhouette.

Undercover

Photos: Vogue Runway

Jun Takahashi is no stranger to creating interesting and fiercely modern knitwear for his collections at Undercover. His post-apocalyptic ’90s cyberpunk collection is very relevant to what’s been happening over the last year with the massive influx of punk, grunge, and metal in menswear. But it isn’t just the heavy knits that make this collection something worth looking into. The outerwear is exceptionally well made and eye-catching. Oversized garments also seemed to be a big selling point throughout the collection. Exaggerated trapeze style coats walked alongside massive, overstretched flannels, and sweaters add to the “I don’t care, I wear what I want!” attitude of the collection.

Lucien Pellat-Finet

Photos: Vogue Runway

“How do you do preppy in 2017 without having to resort to beige cargo shorts and a candy coloured polo shirt?” That must have been the question designer Lucien Pellat-Finet must have been asking himself when he designed this fun take on the varsity jock’s go-to for his Spring 2018 collection. What’s interesting about this collection is the subtle yet completely recognizable throwback to the early ’90s jock — the inviting pastels as well as the velours and gauzy prints that scream varsity loungewear. Think Mark Paul Gosslear in Saved by the Bell, just far more high fashion. Another statement that jumps out here is one that was being made at many of the other collections. There was a real sense of soft femininity which may have either been brought on by the pastels, or the subtle change in fit. While most of the garments looked to be normal length, some were designed to fit a tad bit on the cropped size; an ode to womenswear for sure.

Juun.J

Photos: Vogue Runway

One of the biggest surprises to come out of Paris menswear week this season had to be designer Juun. J’s “formless and genderless” collection. The collection, which featured men’s and women’s clothing, was created with the ultimate goal of being interchangeable, the line between menswear and womenswear virtually indistinguishable. There were clear men and ladies influences. The hard pinstripe suiting and outerwear and the soft flowing shirting and caftan style dresses meshed and interchanged beautifully with one another. The collection showed its audiences that interchangeable unisex collections aren’t something of science fiction. They’re very now and seem to be a driving force behind the engine that is fashion. Take the army green hoodie paired with the long white caftan dress that walked the show. The entire look is completely wearable for both men and women without altering the look of the outfit itself.

Continue following our fashion & lifestyle coverage on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Five Paris Men’s Fashion Week Shows That Stood Out

Each fashion capital comes with its own anticipations, but Paris, for both men’s and women’s collections, is the one that I get more excited about. The Paris Men’s Fashion Week shows offered many wearing staples, and two of the major running themes throughout were a new take on suiting and proportions. Many designers looked to the 80’s and 90’s for inspiration for their Fall 2017 collections. It will be interesting to see how their ideas trickle down to the everyday man, but for those who grew up during those decades it won’t be too overwhelming.

Here is our round up of five collections that stood out during Paris Men’s Fashion Week.

Valentino 

Photo Credit: Yannis Vlamos / Indigital.tv

Pierpaolo Piccioli’s Valentino man might not run in the same circle as the women he designs for, but I was highly impressed by his first solo collection for men. For Fall 2017, the designer brought in a bit of a punk attitude by teaming up with Sex Pistol’s graphic designer, Jamie Reid, and placing two different slogans on coats, sweaters, and baseball caps.

The collection offers men wearable staples, and I am sure the design teams at Zara and H&M are already figuring out how to knock them off.

Dries van Noten

Photo Credit: Yannis Vlamos / Indigital.tv

Any fashion recap I write has to include Dries van Noten. I have been a huge fan of the Belgian for sometime now as he is one of few designers I would wear completely head-to-toe if my bank account permitted.

For fall, van Noten played with proportions — boxy blazers à la David Byrne and oversized sweaters paired with narrow trousers. This look was first seen at Balenciaga, but Dries offered more wearable options and his felt less costume-y.

Berluti 

Photo Credit: Yannis Vlamos / Indigital.tv

Designer Heider Ackermann showed that he can scale back while remaining true to his design aesthetic for his debut as Berluti’s new creative director. The collection offered pieces that will satisfy customers of the brand and die-hard fans of the designer.

Dior Homme

Photo Credit: Yannis Vlamos / Indigital.tv

Kris Van Assche has long proved that he was a worthy successor to Hedi Silmane at Dior Homme. I am not one for wanting to wear a suit but Van Assche showed many options that I could see myself in, and that many guys could wear. The Tron-esque sunglasses are definitely a covetable item for next season.

Thom Browne

Photo Credit: Kim Weston Arnold / Indigital.tv

A Thom Browne show does not always include wearable clothes but the ideas are there. After all, the designer started his career creating cropped trousers and shrunken suit jackets that are all the rage now, but at the time seemed a bit too fashion forward especially from an American designer.

For Fall 2017, the designer continued to play with the idea of suiting proportions and, though there were no 50 shades of grey in the collection, grey was the main color for the collection. Often, what is seen on the runway won’t make it to the stores, but bravo to Thom Browne for continually putting on interesting shows.

Continue following our fashion & lifestyle coverage on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.