Review: Maui Moisture Haircare

Photo via Pinterest.

For some people, there is an immediate prejudice against drugstore hair care products. Much like with makeup, some consider affordable drugstore brands to be lesser somehow than what can be bought specially at a much higher price. The questions supposedly always comes down to quality and effectiveness. It’s a seemingly simple formula: the more expensive the product, the better it has to work, right?

I can already hear many of you protesting because, of course, that isn’t true. As someone who has tried higher-end, pricier hair care versus more affordable brands, the real difference always comes down to personal preferences and finding products that work for your particular issue.

If you’re me, that issue is having very fine, very straight, limp, damaged hair.

This isn’t to say my hair can be low maintenance: it takes two hours to air dry, doesn’t get very frizzy, and, in fact, doesn’t really do anything except sit limply on my head like a wet pillowcase. And over the course of my life thus far, I’ve tried tons of different products all promising various miraculous things for my lifeless locks. I’ve tried volumizing shampoos and conditioners, mousses, volumizing sprays, texturizing sprays, and, on one memorable occasion, hot rollers. Nothing has ever worked as miraculously as promised. Results were usually lacklustre at best, and most of those sprays and mousses just left my hair flat and crunchy.

But I keep trying things, and through these trials and tribulations, I’ve found a couple of holy grail products (Verb’s volumizing spray and IGK’s dry shampoo for example) and some exciting new finds, like the Thicken & Restore collection from Maui Moisture.

When I had the opportunity to try something from Maui Moisture, I went in with medium expectations based on past experiences. The range promises shiny, healthy hair with volume — a highly sought-after, ideal combination for someone with hair like mine. It’s a lot to claim, but any hair care brand out there does its best to boast in order to stand out on the shelves. But here’s the thing: after using the Thicken & Restore + Bamboo Fibres Shampoo, Conditioner and Blow Out Mist, I can say this: these guys also didn’t give me immediate, mind-blowing results, but they did work well enough for me.

To start, some of the primary ingredients in both products are aloe juice and coconut water, an interesting combination that gives the products a pretty heady and intense smell, which I actually love but could put off others. While there are unnatural ingredients also in the products, I was keen to try a hair care product that did contain natural ingredients high up on its content list.

So, the ingredients were looking good, the price point was right (about $10.99 a pop) but then I had to test it out. For a few weeks I’ve been using the shampoo and conditioner and then, when I have blow-dry days (about half the time), the spray.

And no, I didn’t have a miracle moment with suddenly amazing hair. It had to take about a week of use, but I did see a bit of life come into my own boring hair. After about two weeks of use, I felt like my hair had movement, when its default state has been that wet pillowcase thing we talked about earlier. That was kind of a big deal for me, to have a product actually work a little bit instead of not working at all.

My true positive result came at about the two week mark, when I was satisfied with my hair that day enough not to curl it with a hot tool, my go-to to give my hair any kind of shape and bounce. That isn’t to say I didn’t style my hair with hot tools the next day, but it felt good to skip it once. And another weird effect is that my day-two hair now rocks.

The Maui Moisture products did not make my hair magically thicker, but they did make it have a little bounce while moisturizing it really well. Since I do style it with hot tools frequently and have dyed it many times in the past, my poor hair is seriously damaged and always crying out for help. It was really nice to find more products that balance moisture without being heavy on fine hair. You kind of get the best of both worlds with these.

So, yes, I’m sold on the Maui Moisture Thicken & Restore + Bamboo Fibres stuff. It worked really well for me, the chronic flat-hair-er of Canada, and I would recommend trying it to anyone else with similar hair issues. Especially for that price point, as it did work more effectively on my head than some other salon products I’ve tried did. Not that I’ll name brands or anything. Just know they didn’t work out. Shhhhh.

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LAB SERIES: The Science Behind A Great looking Complexion

TEXT: Alexander Sauve

Regardless if you’re a man or a woman, skin changes happen and it’s important to be ready for them. LAB SERIES, an Estée Lauder brand, introduced a new line of men’s grooming products guaranteed to change the way you take care of your skin. Incorporating these five essential skincare products will help to recharge, brighten, and energize your skin for decades to come.

Wash it Up: Clean and Clear

Whether your skin type is dry, oily, or a combination of the two, adding a high-performance face wash is essential for a clean and healthy looking complexion. This multifunctional All-In-One Face Cleansing Gel ($18) deeply cleans, refreshes and balances the complexion without over-drying or irritating the skin. This product also works well for guys with facial hair due to its rich and clean lather. Use morning and night for optimum results.

Moisture Lock

If you haven’t been introduced to the extreme hydrating benefits of a Solid Water Essence ($47) you’re seriously missing out. This bamboo and ginseng infused ingredient powerhouse helps to maintain the moisture and structural balance in the skin and is an innovation in men’s skincare. Use directly after cleansing for best results. Follow with your favorite LAB SERIES products to complete the regimen.

Recharged Now for Later

As we age, our skin becomes drier and less resilient, making it prone to wrinkles and unsightly sagging. Treat a dry and aging complexion with a Water-Charged Gel Cream ($50). This deeply hydrating, lightly scented gel cream maintains the moisture balance in the skin while protecting it against further signs of aging. Apply to the face and neck twice daily for optimum results.

Future Rescue and Repair

If you’re looking for an intense burst of hydration, look no further than Future Rescue Repair Serum ($60). Facial serums are well known for their high-quality ingredients and their ability to repair and benefit the skin. Brightness and skin vitality is restored. Highly concentrated to protect against environmental pollutants, stressors, and aging skin. Use twice daily for optimum results.

Intensely Hydrate

This All-In-One Face Hydrating Gel ($30) gently nourishes and cools the skin while protecting it against further signs of aging and environmental damage. This unique and multifaceted hydrating gel deeply moisturizes the complexion without leaving an oily or heavy residue. Light in texture, it dries with a smooth matte finish and is suitable for all skin types. Use as often as needed for the best results.

LAB SERIES products can be found online and in stores. Visit their website here for the nearest store near you. Continue following our health & lifestyle coverage on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Natural Beauty with Elly Mayday

Source: Forever Yours Lingere

Two years ago, model and social media personality Elly Mayday moved from her hometown of Aylesbury, Saskatchewan, to pursue dreams of traveling the world. She was on the verge of a successful modeling career when a diagnosis of stage-three ovarian cancer and subsequent treatments changed everything.

Mayday experienced many physical and emotional challenges, but she was able to use her illness as a platform to speak about the power of natural beauty and self-acceptance all over the world.

I wanted to show you can be beautiful when you are going through hell…” Mayday says on her website, “I worked really hard on all my shoots because I knew I was doing something that would help others facing cancer as well.”  

Mayday’s determination to embody self-confidence and body-positivity even during the throes of chemotherapy catapulted her into international fame. Since then, she has been featured on Good Morning America, in Women’s Weekly Australia, in documentary-film “A Perfect 14,” and has modeled for Lane Bryant’s “I’m no Angel” campaign.

One unexpected thing that had to change during her treatment, says Mayday, was her beauty routine.

Source: Elly Mayday Official Website

I had liked to do my hair,” she says, ”but when I lost it, I had my wigs… I stopped getting my nails done, [because] I would get sick from all the fumes involved in the process and couldn’t keep them on if I had an operation.”

Mayday’s heightened sensitivity to smells and chemicals found in everyday cosmetics led her to seek out natural alternatives for her favourite beauty products. “I started to do a bit of research and realized there were so many unpronounceable ingredients in something as simple as makeup remover,” she says, “I have some close friends in the all-natural, clean-eating world and knew going that route would be better for me.”

According to a research survey conducted by the David Suzuki Association, 80% of beauty products possessed by participants contained at least one of twelve “dirty dozen” ingredients shown to have potentially harmful effects on the body. For some individuals, exposure to these ingredients can cause very serious health problems.

Consumers are advised by health experts to read cosmetic labels and steer clear of toxic ingredients (such as BHA, PEGs, parabens, parfum, petrolatum, sulfates and triclosan) that can be found lurking in many common cosmetic  and beauty products.

For those wishing to try natural alternatives, Elly recommends her following top five favourite all-natural beauty items:

1. Coconut Oil.

I use this for my makeup remover and moisturizer. I like it because it’s available everywhere, travels easily and you can pre-soak cotton swabs for when you’re  on-the-go.”

2. Aluminum-free Deodorant.

“I use Green Beaver Natural Deodorant.”

3. Lia Reese Lipsticks. 

“These are allergy-tested, hypoallergenic, not tested on animals and fragrance free. They have great pigment and last all day, plus have a subtle scent of vanilla. There are a ton of options for colors and I like to support Canadian-owned companies.”

4. Taproot Organics Cocoa Face Bar. 

“I use this as my face wash. If I’ve forgotten my coconut oil, I have no problem getting my makeup off just using this. It lathers well and gets the job done, and it’s mainly made out of oils that don’t dry my skin out afterwards like a regular bar soap. “

5. Activated Charcoal.

“I use this for a face mask as well as teeth whitener.”

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Back-to-School Must-haves: What I Wish I Had While in School

Back-to-school season is always a long and tiring process. As we grow older, our style evolves, and we right our wrongs when it comes to poor makeup, clothing, and beauty choices. It’s an ongoing evolution and it’s fun! If we drown out that little voice in the back of our heads that tells us there is no ethical form of consumption under capitalism, there is much joy to be found while shopping for back-to-school essentials.

I learned a lot during my four years of University, and I don’t mean in terms of expanding my knowledge of a specific area of study, but I learned a lot about myself and what I could and couldn’t get away with. (Every six months I try to convince myself to get bangs, and every six months I have to have an inner argument. So far I’ve always talked myself out of it.)

As I come freshly into September with my undergrad collecting dust on my wall, I bring a list of things that I would love to share with you that I wish I had while I was attending school. With hopes that these items will bring you some help down the road (like I wish I had), keep scrolling to get the full list.

BEAUTY

Glossier – Boy Brow

I have a love/hate relationship with my eyebrows. As a kid, they were untamed and unruly, and I really didn’t know how to take care of them. Eventually, it became fashion-forward to have thin eyebrows, and in order to fit in with those in my class, I followed suit. It was not a good look. Now that I’m older, I’ve realized the importance of eyebrows and how they shape your face. Boy Brow by Glossier is perfect as it gives great definition to my brows for a standout look while keeping everything in place.

Becca – First Light Filter Face Primer

If you’re like me, you often turn off your alarm clock by hitting snooze every five minutes. When you make this decision you are often making an unconscious decision to give something up in the morning: your make-up routine, breakfast, or your ability to grab some coffee before class without being late. We can’t have it all. On the days I’m especially lazy, I opt out of my full makeup routine and leave the house just wearing Becca’s First Light Filter Face Primer. It gets rid of any puffiness I have, allowing my skin to look more energized and hydrated for the day.

CLOSET

Fenty x Puma – Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

Rihanna has always reigned supreme and it was only a matter of time until she blessed us with her very own clothing line. Who wouldn’t want to dress like Rihanna? During my time in school, I was blessed with her albums, her amazing street style, and even saw her in a concert in my first year of University. The Fenty x Puma Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear collection is the ultimate inspiration for students lounging at the library and getting dressed for a night out with friends.

Dolce & Gabbana – Polar Bear Backpack

In school, you’re always on the go and need a reliable bag to get you from point A to B. The best part about this bag is that you are never going to want to put it down. I mean, look how cute it is. This little guy can hold all your essentials (notebooks, pens, pencils, etc.), and/or be a great source of comfort after spending a long day studying in isolation when you just need a hug.

BEDROOM 

Terrarium

If you have trouble keeping something alive (like a pet or yourself), a terrarium is the perfect household object to liven up your bedroom and show people that there is life under your stacks of books and cobwebs. Seriously, it’s nearly impossible to kill these things (even though I’ve done it), as they hardly require any care to stay alive and add an earthy quality to any bedroom.

Bed Canopy

Have you ever wanted to feel like a princess? I can’t think of anything more Queen-like than accessorizing your bedroom with a bed canopy. It’s a great alternative if you want minimal accessorizing to your bedroom, but want to add a little colour and design to make it pop. Who wouldn’t want to be relaxing under this?

ELECTRONICS

Wireless Speakers

If you take away anything from this list, remember this: wireless speakers are a must. There’s no worse feeling than realizing, the night of your big housewarming party, that your friends have all flaked and forgot their speakers at home. It’s definitely an investment, but it will make all the difference.

Amazon

Fitbit Alta HR

It’s really hard to get to the gym during exam season. Scratch that. It’s really hard to get to the gym, ever. We spend a large part of our days getting from home to work without realizing how much activity we actually do, and the Fitbit Alta is a great way to monitor that. You can set little goals for yourself and follow them through with its easy to use interface.

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Healthy Interiors: A Conversation with Jessica Helps of Wolfe ID

Wolfe ID founder and leader Jessica Helps has been designing for over 14 years and has a unique take on health that incorporates interior design as a way to improve your daily living/wellness. She is inspired by neurobiological, sociocultural, and humanistic perspectives, and designs spaces based on three principles; art, science, and design. She takes into account nature, sound, light, air, water, and, of course, colour. Integrating science into room design can have an impact on your daily mood, productivity, and overall experiences within the space. We had a conversation with Jessica about designing with health and wellness in mind.

Helen Jacob: How long have you been doing interior design?

Jessica Helps: I think this is my 14th year!

HJ: Where did you go to school?

JH: OCAD U. I took environmental design, so it’s more like architecture, or, to dumb it down, how to come up with great concepts for design. The little technicalities and some of the lighter interior design stuff, they expect you to already know. It’s probably one of the hardest things I’ve ever done, getting through that program alive, but it was great!

HJ: When did you first start integrating health and wellness into your designs?

JH: I guess I started researching it about a year and a half ago. I had a couple of clients whose decisions I didn’t agree with. I didn’t know how to tell them, other than giving them my opinion. I knew they were going to be making a mistake and the space wasn’t going to feel that great. They were doing an office layout and they wanted a lot of desks in the space but I knew the way the office would function wasn’t superior. I tried to direct them but I had really no way of telling them why I was right other than saying it was just my opinion. It wasn’t really sinking in with the client so I was kind of upset and afterwards, I thought well how can I prove this? There must be some science behind what I’m saying because I somewhat know it to be true. So I started researching it and I realized there was this whole field of environmental psychology (how people feel within a space and why, and the science behind why people interpret space and light and colour and volumes and also proximity and layout of furniture). So when I realized that, I got into biophilic design and then I realized there was a complete line of science behind interiors that we tend to avoid or not really understand. We don’t really direct our designs based on the science around them. So it’s pretty interesting.

HJ: Is it a new concept?

JH: It’s relatively new…well yes and no. Sometimes I think the colour theory — like how colours affect people — that’s not new. But research based design is pretty new. Let me give you an example. If you were designing a corridor for maybe an old folks home for the elderly, as an interior designer how would you design that space? I was thinking I’d pick light calm colours, tone on tone, just something really relaxing and simple and clean. Well, I learned that’s actually a really stressful environment for somebody who’s 75, because a 75-year-old has 1/8th of the contrast vision that a 25-year-old has. So if everything is the same colour, it might be all nice and light but they can’t distinguish the floor from the walls or see handrails or see doors. So it’s actually very stressful for them. They need the contrast to be able to properly navigate themselves through a space, you realize that (the science) should direct the design, not the fact that I want to do tone on tone grey.

HJ: What is biophilic design?

JH: Biophilic design is centered on the relationship humans have with nature. They say there is an innate relationship between nature and humans. We feel good around natural settings. What we’ve done is built these urban cities that are really hard. They’re concrete, glass, and metal. They’re very man-made, very hard. And they’ve actually created a separation from nature which actually leaves people feeling cold or distant or disconnected. So biophilic design focuses on bringing natural elements back into the environment.  Light greenery such as green walls or hanging plants, cactuses, and things of that nature are good. Natural finishes like woods or tiles or things that you can touch that have a natural texture are also good. Also focus on light as well, like getting natural light into a space. Those three things I find in biophilic design, really give back that connection with nature that makes us feel better.

HJ: What do you think about the minimalist interior trend?

JH: I think right now there is a Scandinavian trend so its really popular to be clean. You know there’s that documentary on Netflix called Minimalist. I fully like what they’re doing. It’s a very healthy design, it’s natural materials and simple design. It’s reducing visual complexity and simplifying everything and I think that really does make humans feel better and happier in spaces. So whether or not people are focused on what is the healthiest design, I think the trend is good.

HJ: What do you take into consideration when incorporating wellness and health?

JH: Well it depends on the function of the space. What I always do is go into a space and what I ask the client is how do you want to feel in the space? So if it’s an office or it’s a home, or a specific room, start with the feeling: How do you want to feel in here? Do they want to feel really relaxed or do they want a cozy room or do they want their living room to be a place where they can entertain their family and curl up and read a book? We would start with that feeling and then build out from there. The furniture and colours and textures that would give them that feeling. You might see a pretty picture on Pinterest and you just want that and then when you get it, it doesn’t make you feel quite the way you wanted. So I always start with the feeling first and the function.

HJ: Sound, light, air water, and colour. Could you speak to each of those?

JH: Well for sound, there’s lots of issues with acoustics. It causes hypertension in people and it’s one of those things that creeps up on you. You don’t realize it’s causing you unwanted stress. So if you have thins walls- maybe you live in a warehouse conversion so neighbours or people above you can be really disturbing. Also if you’re designing a restaurant and you have a lot of hard finishes, you get a lot of clash of noise that bounces around and it’s hard to hear the person you’re having dinner with. So you can do ceiling panels, or white noise machines. You can also add fabric underneath tables and chairs- you just want softer finishes to absorb the noise rather than have it bounce. Also be aware of mechanical systems or appliances or photocopiers that are generally really noisy because they can also lead you to feel really stressed out if they’re going off all the time. Put them in a closed space or arrange the furniture to be further away.

HJ: What about light?

JH: You just want to maximize the amount of natural light you’re getting. There’s some crazy statistic that a lot of offices don’t have natural light- like no windows. I guess you’re tucked away in a basement or something. It actually causes productivity to plummet when you don’t have natural light or plants or have an environment that’s inspiring you to even be there. Its important to control light. In the evenings, dim your lights one hour before going to bed. Everybody has circadium rhythm. That’s the body’s way of regulating sleep and alertness. Everyone has one and it’s usually timed with the sunset and sunrise. And so the most natural way to wake up is with the sunrise and go to bed with the sunset. Obviously we don’t do that living in the city because everything is rather artificial and our schedules do not follow that. So dimming your lights in the evening gets your body to release melatonin and melatonin helps you regulate sleep. Try to block out all the light when you’re sleeping. You want a perfectly dark cave to sleep in.

HJ: Air and water?

JH: Those are the two functional items in a space. We have standards and we have building code and that’s great, but it is a minimal. Air quality is actually better outdoors than it is indoors in the city. Our indoor air quality is terrible. So you can up the filter on your H-vac system. If you live in a condo, you have what’s called a fan coil, (a vertical mechanical unit and with a filter on it). If you live at home you have a furnace that will also have an air filter in it where the intake of the air is going through. So you can up the quality of that- (from 10-15 is optimal). MERV is the rating. Or HEPA filter is the best, you’ll find them in Tesla cars and some vacuums have them. Those will really help your air quality. For water quality, if you have the ability to add a filter right into your system, that’s great. Or you can add a reverse osmosis. You can also just get an on counter water filter that makes the water alkaline and also reduces the toxins in it as well.

HJ: How would you work with colour?

JH: Colour is interesting because I don’t think there’s an unhealthy colour. There’s unhealthy uses of colour or just ways to maximize your health using colour. So say I was designing a spa bathroom and I want it to be relaxing, the three things I would not do is paint it red, put super bright lights in it, or play the music super loud. Those are all things that are very invigorating and make you excitable. So you want lower lighting, have softer and more comfortable furniture, more warmer and natural colours so the body is relaxing on a biological level. Green, greys and white are more relaxing and restorative.

HJ: Do you have any tips to integrate this into a cubicle setting?

JH: Umm yeah, maybe get rid of your cubicle? It’s an interesting question. The Google office kind of set the precedent for how to blow the typical corporate office out. They got rid of board rooms and cubicles and did the complete opposite. They did ballpits for adults and beanbag chairs and a lounge. It was almost like a playground for adults. This caught on because it was fun and employees were happier. They’re excited to come to work and productivity goes up. And that’s true- for Google. Google is generally a bunch of creative people doing stuff on computers so that works really well. But what they’re starting to notice now is within every office, there are certain people that work really well in private spaces, semi private spaces, or communal spaces. Some people who are forced to work in a communal space who would rather work in a private space, suffer and their productivity goes down. So you really have to look at your office and decide which departments need what kind of space. If you do have a cubicle, and you do like the private space I would at least pick a fun cubicle. They have some really great systems right now. A lot of them have acoustic paneling within them so you get really good acoustics. Some of them have little benches that pull out so you can still invite people to come hang out at your desk and you still get that human connection for people who don’t like being isolated. Some offices will have little plants or cactuses so you have that biophilic element. Also, employees who get taken care of tend to be the most productive.

HJ: Is there a way to organize your space that’s good for you?

JH: Yes, reducing visual complexity is huge. If you have open shelves jammed with junk, and you’re looking at it all the time, it’s visually overpowering. Hiding your visual clutter creates a freeness. If it’s already clean, then you can do what you need to do in that space without worrying about cleaning up the mess. You don’t want anything see through, like acrylic boxes.

HJ: What are the main elements to consider when revamping your space in terms of health and wellness?

JH: I think its all about creating a space that feels good. I think you really have to touch on the biophilic design. Like what’s natural about the space? What makes you want to work there? Light quality is huge. If you have no natural light, it’s essentially a storage room. I think people need to stop worrying about specific fixtures or details and think how does this space make me feel? Then you look at ways to maximize the space.