What Not to Miss at SummerWorks 2017

SummerWorks is known as a great avenue for emerging artists in Toronto to present their work. Hosting over 500 artists and performing in over 50 performance projects across the city in multiple venue formats. This year, SummerWorks is curated by the new Artistic Director, Laura Nanni, whose major theme this year driving her curation of the festival focused around the question: “how do we come together?”

There are beautiful relationships built between artists and audiences, sharing art and creating intimate moments and experiences within a single hour. Laura Nanni set to focus on how we connect “across these cultural, geographical, social and political divides and also how artists are using technology to facilitate that connection and mediate artistic experiences.”

Below, we have listed some must see acts throughout the festival to enjoy with friends, family, or solo.

SUMMERWORKS 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

The Archivist – Created, Performed and Produced by Shaista Latif 

Shaista Latif is a lot of different people. She’s created them all to serve you. War, Sex, Money and Art has shaped her places in the world. As a response, Shaista makes an archive of music, text, video and stories to see if she can create one identity that will serve all.

 Chemical Valley Project (Double Bill with Perfection) Created by Julia Howman and Kevin Matthew Wong

Aamjiwnaang, an indigenous community of 800 residents, is smothered by the Canadian petrochemical industry. Two sisters, Vanessa and Lindsay Gray, have dedicated themselves to fighting environmental racism and protecting their community’s land and water. In Chemical Valley Project, theatre-makers Kevin and Julia document and explore Canada’s ongoing relationship with energy infrastructure, its colonial past and present, and indigenous solidarity and reconciliation.

 

DIVINE – Written by Natalie Frija; Directed by Claire Burns; Performed by Amanda Cordner, Aviva Armour-Ostroff, Christina Bryson, Sarah Naomi Campbell, Haley Garnett and Rehaset Yohanes

Ontario is out of water and a pair of bandits search for their last hope – a water diviner by the name of Penn. Stories say she can crack the world like a coconut and make water bubble to the surface with nothing but her hands. But the bandits aren’t the only ones hunting her down. And what if there’s nothing left for Penn to divine? An all woman cast in Natalie Frijia’s post-apocalyptic wild west asks how we would survive in a world without water. Would we turn to community… or to revenge?

 

 

Explosions for the 21st Century – Written, Designed, and Performed by Chris Ross-Ewart; Directed and Dramaturged by Graham Isador

With field recordings, audio effects, and a well-timed air horn, Explosions for the 21st Century uses sound design to explore contemporary culture. The result is part lecture, part stand-up, and part existential crisis. Written and performed by Chris Ross-Ewart, the show is an erratic, real time, exploration of why we make sound and how we listen.

  

Let’s Try This Standing – Written and Performed by Gillian Clark; Directed by Anthony Black

Six years ago, Gillian was hit by an SUV. She was on the sidewalk. Now, Gillian is a professional theatre artist. Let’s Try This Standing is about shitting on nurses, having sex with atrophied muscles, and being massaged by a therapist as he eats a bagel. It doesn’t offer easy answers, but it does let us be in a room together and be honest about how okay we are.

 

 Mother Sea / Manman la Mer (Double Bill with What Do You See?)  Written and Performed by Djennie Laguerre; Directed and Dramaturgy by Rhoma Spencer

In the tradition of Haitian storytelling, Mother Sea / Manman la Mer) takes us on a journey that joins magic, love, and redemption. It is the story of a woman who can see the future in her dreams but is cut off from her abilities by her mother’s fear. After healing from a mysterious sickness, her dreams disappear along with her sense of self. 25 years later, only her grandmother can restore her faith and her ancestral lineage.

 

The Only Good Indian – Project Design by Jivesh Parasram; Co-Created by Jivesh Parasram, Tom Arthur Davis, and Donna-Michelle St. Bernard

Part lecture, part meditation, and part threat, The Only Good Indian takes a shockingly raw look at where our similarities begin and where they end. Each night a different performer straps themselves into an extreme situation – forcing the audience to ask – what would you die for?

 

Serenity Wild – Directed by Audrey Dwyer; Written by Katie Sly

Amy has a hard time feeling present. Liam, her loving boyfriend, will do whatever he can to wake her up – whether Amy’s ready for it or not. Tenderness turns into teasing turns into BDSM, and Amy’s boundaries around safety and danger become blurred. At what point does Liam’s concern become coercion? Can Amy trust Liam’s good intentions, or is presence a place she needs to find on her own? Winner of the 2016 Wildfire National Playwriting Competition.

 

 

The Waves – Written, Performed, and Produced by Laura Quigley

Co-Directed by Governor General Award-winning playwright Judith Thompson and world-renowned singer / ‘vocalographer’ Fides Krucker, The Waves offers a unique sonic experience with a score that stretches the boundaries of vocal expression on stage. Written and performed by Laura Quigley, the play is based on three generations of birth stories and explores birth, motherhood, and the dark undercurrent of one woman’s struggle with post-partum depression.

 

 

White Man’s Indian – Written and Performed by Darla Contois; Direction and Dramaturgy by Ed Roy

This is the story of Eva, a Cree teenage girl, and her journey through the maze of a White Man’s high school. In a hilarious new work from emerging First Nations artist Darla Contois, Eva goes on a quest for identity and spirituality through the hallways of teen angst, racism, and an evil prom queen. Both poetic and humorous, White Man’s Indian is a moving story of memory, courage, alienation, and belonging.

 

The Invisible City – Concept and Direction by Daniele Bartolini; Performed by Rory de Brouwer, Danya Buonastella and Joslyn Rogers

 The creators of The Stranger present a new interactive experience, divided into two episodes. Starting from your own home, you will receive a mysterious night time phone call. A voice invites you and a group of strangers to speak about your dreams and share your life story. The following night, you will enter the invisible city and be transported through a collective dream. See website for full performance details.

 

 

Landline – Created by Dustin Harvey and Adrienne Wong

A performance that takes place in two places at once, Landline is a curious exposure to the feeling of being alone, together… You will become both the audience and the performer as you converse in real time via text message with a fellow participant in Hamilton and go on an audio-guided, experiential walking tour. As the experience unfolds, you are prompted to share stories, memories, and secrets as the urban landscape transforms into a backdrop for the relationship forming between two strangers.

 

Ghost Days – Created and Performed by Terrance Houle

Evoking our colonial and non-colonial histories that exist in the light of night as in the darkness of the day, GHOST DAYS awakens a collaboration with artists, audience, and spirit. Internationally celebrated performance artist Terrance Houle will work in residence over night at the Theatre Centre throughout the festival, culminating in a final performance that combines video, performance, photography, and music to conjure spirits and ghosts as audience and collaborators.

 

Find the full line up and details of SummerWorks here, and continue following our arts and culture coverage on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Trend Report: New York and Paris Men’s Fashion Weeks

New York Men’s Fashion Week and Paris Men’s Fashion Week have had contrast for quite some time. While Paris is known to host some of the most infamous designers such as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Balmain, New York is more likely to showcase designers that are breaking out into the fashion world. However, Paris and New York, European and American— there are still some common grounds on what is on trend for Spring 2018. Here are some trends that rocked both the Paris and New York Men’s Fashion Weeks

Drapery

Forget about shedding the layers this spring as designers show how to add texture and depth to a style by use of drapery. Whether it’s a sweater, t-shirt, or jacket, layering is what is on trend this season! Designers, Raf Simons, Louis Vuitton, and Juun. J, and more place beautiful pieces on top of one another to create alternative ways of seeing symmetry and proportions in fashion.

 Patterned Button-Ups

A definite statement look is achieved when wearing a patterned button-up t-shirt on top of a solid piece. Lucien Pellat-Finet, Descendant of Thieves, and Louis Vuitton play homage to the 90’s while emphasising the care-free nature of this look! The patterned button-up is not only for vacations as when worn with attention to detail,  it can emphasize the unique and playful nature of one’s style.

Athleisure

If only athlete’s actually looked this good! Sports uniform designers should take notes as the world of athletics is evolving into a place where not everyone needs to be athletic, but we can all enjoy the perks of looking like we are! Gustav Von Aschenbach, Valentino, and Wood House celebrate athleisure by pairing comfortable looking, and matching pieces together to create a sense of uniformity and also individualism as these looks are certainly made for the accessibility needed on the street.

Scarves

A great scarf is always a good way to add drama to an outfit. However, there is no denying that this accessory goes through periods of being strictly on trend and not. Descendant of Thieves, Valentino, and Dior Homme not only exemplify this look as being on trend for the upcoming season but also show that there is really no way to go wrong when adding this accessory to your look. As a bandana, a hidden piece worn under your outfit, or as a statement thin scarf, there are endless opportunities when thinking of how to wear this accessory!

High-waisted Pants

It seems like every season there is a gratifying nod to past centuries as looks such as shoulder pads, fringe, and bell-bottoms grace the runway. This year, the 80’s were definitely celebrated, which was evident when seeing the designers who showed a statement, high-waisted pant. The look has been a statement in most women’s wardrobes for years now, but designers Issey Miyake, Bode, and Raun Larose feature this piece in menswear. The look adds a masculine-chic layer to your outfit when paired with a solid button-up or t-shirt!

 

Bars Around Town: Archive

On one side of Archive, an exposed brick wall partly covered with a vase of baguettes and jars of pickles and dried herbs and spices lead to the bar and kitchen. On the other, a pristine white wall is background for a row of wooden tables and a bench, and decorative photographs of ferris wheels and a carousel. The space is longer than it is wide and is decidedly cozy. On a recent visit, a traveler sat planning out her itinerary next to a group of coworkers on a night out; a young couple perched by the bar and chatted with the staff; two old women sat in the corner by the window and quietly worked on their bottle of orange wine. With its two windows facing a calmer bit of Dundas West and Bellwoods and low hung yellow lights, Archive is a picture of a place one imagines one would someday stumble into, make chance acquaintance with and fall in love.

The wine list is not exhaustive but long enough for a good perusal and the small menu of tapas and cheese & meats encourage adventures and learning by trial and error. The staff take a “What do you like to drink?” approach, which is, more often than not, for formality than function, but the 3oz glass option ease the pressure. But a recommendation from a well informed staff — a glass of Trebbiano d’Abruzzo from A. A. Tiberio — was refreshingly dry and delicious with notes of flowers and, in the parlance of wine descriptions, ‘minerals.’ The point, it dawned on me half way through my second glass, was to be okay with not putting the exacting words of description to a wine. A glass of pinot noir from Alsace sealed my trust in her recommendations.

The foods offers, however, were less satisfying. Small savory snacks are offered as ‘Nibbles,’ $5 per plate or three plates for $13. Though the warmed olives are decent, neither the lupini beans (served in olive oil and salt) nor the shishito peppers offer much flavor. That the bread and oil are not complementary is perhaps becoming the norm in the restaurant world today, but the utterly soft and flavorless slices of baguette were an affront to good hospitality. Neither the Prosciutto nor the Chorizo offered much solace, but the Comté was, as it often is, satisfying. The steak tartare is served with the yolk of a quail egg and the shaved vegetable salad includes watermelon radishes.

Archive is located at 909 Dundas St W and is open everyday from 5pm to 2am. Continue following our arts & culture coverage on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Models of the moment 2017

Dilone

Photo: Vogue Mexico

It’s come as no surprise that Dilone has been on every fashion industry insiders radar. Originally from New York, Dilone has captivated everyone in the industry. Allowing her top spots in magazine editorials, covers, runway shows, and ads. And as all fashion lovers know, campaigns and editorials are where the real money is. With campaigns for Stella McCartney, covers for Allure, and countless runway shows under her belt. Dilone star is absolutely on the right path to model stardom.

Achok Majak

Photo: CR Fashion Book

How does one become an easily recognizable face in the world of fashion? Book a campaign for one of the hottest brands in the world. After having debuted last year, the South Sudanese model has been hot on every magazine’s presses with editorial after editorial. But her big break came when Gucci booked her for multiple runways shows. From there, Achok has had the privilege of being a Gucci muse. Starring in the house’s stunning Pre-fall 2017 campaign.

Yoon Young Bae

Photo: I-D Magazine

South Korea has had a plethora of top models come up through the ranks to solidify their careers in recent years. However, it’s the new faces coming from the Korean peninsula that has everyone revisiting the Asian model explosion that happened a few years back. One young lady creating a lot of buzz these days is Yoon Young Bae. Having walked in everything from Chanel and  Dior to Fenty and Loewe. Yoon is quickly becoming a staple on the runways for the world.

Manuela Sanchez

Photo: On The Rocks Magazine

Coming in off of the back end of the Carribean and Afro-Latinx model hype that took the fashion world by storm a few seasons ago. Manuela Sanchez has quickly become a Latinx industry favourite like her Dominican sister Lineisy Montero and Ysuanny Brito. Her gorgeous face brings and interesting, yet strikingly familiar look to the runway that has captivated brands like Dior, Giambattista Valli, Fendi and Prada; who even gave her a coveted spot in their f/w 2017 campaign.

He Cong

Photo: T Magazine

China seems to be a powerhouse for models these days. With handfuls of new faces being sent into the fashion world season after season, and with good reason. Why not convince the largest luxury market in the world to buy products by showcasing it on one of your own. One of the fastest growing stars to come from China is Cong He. The angelic doll faced model has nabbed almost every important magazine cover in China and is slowly doing the same around the world. With a solid booking during couture week, as well as blue chip campaigns for Prada resort, Coach fall 2017, and MAC Cosmetics. Cong can definitely move over to the list of most in demand models of the year.

Trading Places: Leather Jackets and Floral Dresses

As much as I hate to say it, I shop at Zara and I wear all black. I’m basic. Nothing against Zara, I think it’s one of the trendiest places to shop without having to shell out all your savings. The all black may have stemmed from character- or just plain laziness. It doesn’t require much effort and it’s safe. When I pick something off the rack, there’s a guaranteed eye roll coming from whomever I went shopping with that day. I don’t have what they call a “summer wardrobe”.

My clothing choices are predictable and almost always funeral appropriate. Needless to say, it’s now a lifestyle. So when I was paired up with Adina, who comes into the office wearing floral prints and coloured blazers, I knew I was going to have to get out of my comfort zone. I had the peace of knowing it wouldn’t be too crazy with mixing prints and all that, but it would still be difficult. Who knows, I might take something from this. Baby steps people.

DAYTIME OUTFIT:

Adina: I don’t think I’ve ever worn a sheer top before, so this was a new adventure for me. I liked the floral detailing on it a lot, but sheer plus the camisole is not my usual cup of tea. That being said, I think I’d be open to trying sheer things now that I know I can kind of pull it off. The pants were pretty comfortable actually, and I would wear them everywhere. I could have slept in those pants. I wasn’t totally sure if I put the shoes on correctly, to be honest. They were cute but confusing and squished my toes a bit.

Helen: Ok. Because we shop at some of the same stores, I didn’t think our styles would be a total contrast. I knew Adina would put me in patterns and colour, both of which are foreign for me, but I thought I would be fine.  I was entirely wrong, and a little, (a lot) uncomfortable not being in head to toe black. Jeans and a button up top shouldn’t make someone feel this strange but as simple as it is, this was not an outfit I’d ever pick out myself. For one, I don’t own an actual pair of jeans. However, I might go pick up a pair now that I’ve been reintroduced. The top was really comfortable but I still don’t see myself standing at checkout with it. And the wretched yellow bag- sorry Adina but that was painful.

NIGHTTIME OUTFIT:

Adina: You can’t tell in the picture, but those were some seriously high heels. I felt like a baby giraffe trying to walk for the first time. The highest heels I own are not even two inches tall. They made the whole outfit feel pretty fancy, but I can’t imagine walking anywhere in those shoes. The dress was more low cut than I usually wear, but since it was loose it didn’t feel super exposing. The leather jacket was my favourite thing out of both outfits. It looked badass and gave this whole outfit a bit of spunkier edge.

Helen: I’m in a dress. I’m wearing pink flowers. I also think my hair got even bigger from being stressed out about all the colour. Ok, that might’ve been a tad dramatic. It’s just that the handful of dresses I own are all the same, a black number with clean lines. This was not that.  I feel like this ensemble makes me look younger, and honestly, I probably would’ve bought this whole outfit if I was past me, before I found myself. I also don’t usually wear denim but this jacket I didn’t mind. You can’t see it in this photo but there was also a dainty rose gold necklace that tied this whole look together, which I would totally wear outside of this little experiment

Final Thoughts:

Adina: I think the only time before this that I’ve ever worn so much black at once was to a funeral. I guess I’ve always thought of black as being boring or for those who are more on the punk or goth side than I. That being said, I was pleasantly surprised to find that both outfits had more personality than I expected and that all those black pieces look good together. Both outfits were also much fancier than I normally wear, but it’s opened me up to more fashion possibilities. I’m also gonna go back to Zara when it gets colder so I can buy that jacket.

Helen: Adina’s style is approachable and not too crazy so I didn’t think I would have a hard time leaving the all black uniform for a few minutes. But I still felt a bit self-conscious stepping out of the shadows with that lemon yellow shoulder bag (because people could def see me now). Other than that, I didn’t mind the denim and could probably do with some jean additions in my closet. That being said,  I’ll leave the girl-next-door look to Adina and stick to my Addams Family attire.