Catchin a cold at Toronto new surf shop

Aliya N Barnes in front of Elie Landesberg’s photo.
Photos by Sveta Soloveva 

Try on a juicy rash guard, flip through a surf magazine, grab a board of your dream and … go surfing!

Are the Great Lakes too cold for you? Don’t worry, Surf the Greats company got you covered. Their new surf shop and café at 276 Carlaw Avenue offers thick cold water wetsuits, surf booties, and mittens from Rip Curl. While the warmest gear keeps your body comfortable, the beach-inspired events and parties will take care of your mood. For example, until July 29th, Catchin A Cold photo exhibit showcases works from 16 artists who represent all five of the Great Lakes.

Hidden in the labyrinth of the building, the shop became one of many surfers’ favourite spots in Toronto even before it opened. Even while under construction, it hosted Toronto’s premiere of environmental movie Island Earth and welcomed adventure photographer Chris Burkard who was in to Toronto to present his surf documentary Under An Arctic Sky.

Now the shop is officially open and it offers everything surfers need for their soul and body, from surfboards, apparel, sun care, and printed matters to surf and yoga lessons, energizing drinks, and many exciting events like film screenings and live music concerts!

“The atmosphere is totally amazing,” said 20-year-old Aliya N. Barnes, who attended the grand opening party on June 29th. “It’s colourful and bright, but it still has a nice surf chill feeling. I feel like I wanna live here.”

Surf the Greats’ owner Antonio Lennert said that the physical shop is an extension of their online platform that brought many surf enthusiasts together through organizing beach cleanups and free yoga classes and offering surf equipment and lessons for the last three years.

“We started online as a media outlet to connect all different communities of surfers over the Great Lakes using hashtag ‘surf the greats’,” he said. “I feel like we’ve earned the community’s trust by giving, and now the community is giving back to us. That’s why now we have a home, and there’s so many people here and so much positivity. It just feels very special.”

Surf the Greats’ sign over the bar table is shimmers in its juicy colours, shifts from pink to blue and from blue to green. Dj Great Lake Shark (Ellie Landesberg) creates a tropical vibe with folktronica tracks until the band Gold Complex takes over with their live acoustic.

Gold Complex performs at the surf shop on June 29

Guests sample RISE Kombucha, order beer from Sweetgrass Brewing Co., and explore newly arrived surfboards and apparel. There are a couple of major brands like Vans Canada and Rip Curl, but Surf the Greats tries to stay local as much as possible and carries products from Montreal, Tofino, BC, and Toronto, along with their own brand.

Walking through the rows of beach bags and rash guards, the visitors occasionally stop and stare at the photos of Catchin A Cold exhibit. The sixteen photographs vary from black and white to colourful, and show surfers riding or waiting for waves, walking to and staring at the water. “What you see on the walls is a mix of professional photographers and people who go to beach with their phones,” said Lennert. “We tried to make sure that we represented all the Great Lakes, amateur and professional photographers, male and female photographers.” Surf the Greats announced the photo competition in the winter and, working with Vans Canada, selected the winning works out of 700 submissions.

Dj Great Lake Shark (Elie Landesberg) creates a tropical vibe at Surf the Greats’ grand opening party
“I took this photo in Scarborough, Ontario, in a very-very stormy day, and there was one surfer out in very turbulent water,” Elie Landesberg told Novella about his black and white photo. “Because the sky was so grey and the birds were blowing around the sky, I thought it was a metaphor for my life and for surfing to see somebody sitting insulated, so calm among so much turbulence and chaos.”
Lennert said Surf the Greats will host a new event every week. Many of them are free or by donation. Check out a screening of a the surf movie GIVEN on July 20, a wave forecasting workshop on July 29th, and beach yoga every Sunday morning.
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A Conversation With Jake Rosenberg

Based in New York and originally from Toronto, Jake Rosenberg spends most of his time everywhere else. As Co-Founder and Creative Director of global media brand Coveteur, Jake Rosenberg is making quite the name for himself. 

It was while working under photographer Chris Nicholls that Rosenberg met his now business partner, Stephanie Mark. In 2011 they launched Coveteur as a passion project and the site crashed on day 1. It has since grown to be the leading destination for a luxurious, behind the scenes look at all things fashion, lifestyle, and culture: “He’s one half of the duo shaking up lifestyle media by producing lucrative native advertising campaigns for luxury brands including Chanel and Dior.” We had a conversation with Rosenberg himself about how Coveteur came about and what it’s like traveling 25 days out of the month.

Helen: So are you a photographer first?

Rosenberg: Overall, I would say I’m a cofounder of Coveteur first, and then I split the creative director and photographer role.

H: How did you start?

R: It really was a passion project right from the beginning. I was 23 years old, living in Toronto, and assisting photographers in the industry here. I had just graduated from Industrial design at the Ontario College of Art and Design so I was extremely excited about branding and experience design and just creating something new and innovative. And that’s when I met my business partner Stephanie Mark. We worked together on a project and the next day, this kind of just happened. We got together, we decided to start something new and we built a brand, created some content and we published it. The first day the site was live, it crashed and we like “omg, whats going on?!” Shortly after that we decided that this is what we’re going to do full time. Six months after we started the site, we started to get new clients and then pretty much right from there we just kept on going. Six years later, we have an office in Toronto and in New York, great staff, a lot of great clientele, and we published a book in October.

The book is Coveteur: Private Spaces, Personal Style. It features 43 people from around the world in their homes covering their styles, their interiors, etc. It’s a very iconic imagery of Coveteur.

H: What kind of content do you create?

R: We offer luxury lifestyle content across the board, predominantly women’s focused. And it covers fashion, beauty, health and wellness, travel.

H: When did your career start taking off?

R: I like to think that I’m still building my career and this is the first amazing project that I’m getting to build and work on but creating Coveteur has definitely led me to work with so many inspiring people and brands that I never expected to work with. So being able to spend time with people like Oprah and Cindy Crawford and having them allow me to photograph them and work with them in such close proximity, I would say has definitely helped my career.

H: What kind of projects do you do? Lifestyle media seems like a huge umbrella.

R: Predominantly as a company, I oversee the creative direction of the company so the full vision of the company, kind of making sure that everything stays in line with our creative vision and then I spend most of my time working on the native content for the site. So working in collaboration with brands like Chanel or Gucci or Saks to put together a piece of content in a series that really speak to our audience. And help serve their brand and their product

H: What is your favourite project that you’ve worked on?

R: Any project with Chanel has been spectacular but I think in terms of the company as a whole, I think working on the book. The book I really took time. Being able to publish and work on, so intimately, a coffee table book, published by one of my favourite art publishers I think was a very big moment for me and spending time with all the people that worked on the book. The book has 703 images, about 241 pages. It’s beautiful, it’s exactly how I wanted it to turn out. That project for me was very exciting and I’m very proud of how it turned out.

H: Where do you draw inspiration from for your projects?

R: From all over. Because I did study industrial design, I do pull a lot of inspiration from brands or designers or product that I interact with on a daily basis- and also Instagram. I mean Instagram is such a great tool for finding new and exciting people and things.

H: It says here that you travel 25 days out of the month. What’s that like?

R: It’s exciting and challenging at the same time. I get opportunities to go places and see people and have experiences that most people in the world don’t get to do so I would say I’m always excited about my next trip. But at the same time, it is a very big challenge to be on multiple time zones a month, sometimes a week. Generally I live out of a suitcase. I’ve gotten really good at doing that, I’ve done that for a long time so it’s fine. I think it’s also a really big challenge to work with the staff in the office when I’m on the road for so long. It just means that everyone has to work a little bit harder or stay a little more connected because sometimes I’ll be on a 12 hour difference time zone shooting in Thailand. So ill be done my day there and then they’d just be getting up. So that means we all just have to get in that extra time whenever I can but fore the most part, its amazing. I’ve literally spent countess hours, miles traveling the world and I love it.

H: So you don’t have a typical day?

R: I don’t have a typical day no. I have a typical day in the office and then I have a non-typical day when I’m on the road.

H: Are you doing work most of the time or do you kind of get to explore where you are?

R: Generally it’s work. I mean any kind of free day when I’m abroad is usually a resting day. Travelling that much is hard on you mentally and physically so when I do happen to have a free day, I try to rest. And because of the nature of my job I like to think that it’s kind of all mixed together. So depending on the project, I was just in Thailand or Aston or wherever, they all kind of overlap in terms of work and exploring kind of thing. And I think because of what we do at Coveteur,  a lot of the time we go to a new city and meet local people and they always kind of end up showing us their little world which is think is such a great insight into that city from a local’s perspective

H: Where have you been so far?

R: The furthest I’ve been is China, and Russia probably. I was in Dubai twice in 10 days. For the book alone, we went to London, paris , LA, Moscow, Antwerp, Dubai, New York- a lot of places. And then Thailand.

H: What was your favourite place to travel?

R: I think Barcelona has been one of my favourite places to travel. I spent about a week or almost 10 days in Barcelona. I just had an amazing time. I loved the city, the culture, the people, the energy. So that’s probably one of my favourite places to travel. Also I think Toronto. I don’t get to come here so much anymore but Toronto’s where I’m from. I love coming home. I love visiting Canada. I think Toronto is still one of my favourite cities, out of every place I’ve ever been. And then I think St. Barth’s. I was recently there and it just reminded me how special it really is. It’s such a small unique island that I’ve grown to love. I feel like it has such a unique community there that has a very exclusive aspect to it but it’s just beautiful and I love it there

H: Do you have any destination hotspot recommendations? (restaurants, places to go)

R: Actually you know what, Brazil is one of my favourite places in the world. I went to Rio. I would recommend everyone to go to Rio at least one time. I mean it’s like an urban centre built into the jungle on the coast, and it is just so lively and energetic and it is fun every single day. Once you’re in Rio, if you just take a little trip down to Florianapolis- or people call it Floripa. That’s probably my all time favourite island on the planet so far. I think I was there over Christmas and New Year’s so it was more of a vacation. Half the island is posh and I think it has like 42 beaches on the island. It is a spectacular place to visit and just relax and have fun.

H: What’s one place that surprised you?

R: I think Dubai surprised me. I had no preexisting expectations for Dubai but I had a great time. I was there twice, once for the Chanel cruise show and then I went back ten days later and I was a guest of one of the royal families. I had a great time. It was definitely different from anywhere else I’ve been. The people I met there and the experiences I had were all great.

H: Do you find it tiring ever?

R: It’s challenging. If you’re changing time zones as much as I do, it becomes tiring.

H: Is it hard to balance work and time off or just time for yourself?

R: I think as as a co-founder, I think that’s the biggest challenge to have that work life balance. I’m just so passionate and dedicated to what I do. I get to have fun with it, although it does get to be a challenge when it comes to taking time off for myself. I think anytime I do, it’s when I really need to. That only allows me to recharge and come back even stronger. But I’m always excited for it.

H: Do you have any favourite spots in Toronto?

R: My backyard with my family haha. A good friend of mine, Janet Zuccarini has a couple restaurants here- she’s got Gusto 101, Cafe Nervosa, and Pai- all of those restaurants I would recommend. I would always recommend just going down to the waterfront, going to Trinity Bellwoods in the summer, just hang out and listen to music and all that kind of stuff is really fun. Go to a baseball game, go to the islands, check that out. But usually when I come home, it’s family time.

H: Where would you like to be in 10 years? Do you still want to be traveling?

R: I think I’d always like to be traveling. There’s so many places in the world I’d like to see that I have yet to see. I am excited for the next five to ten years of Coveteur and the growth and opportunity that lays ahead. I think we’ll keep growing and exploring new opportunities and new avenues for business that will bring our brand to the next level.

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Trading Places – Crisscrossing Black and Yellow

After four years of Fashion School, I came out with two things: limited job prospects and a wardrobe consisting of black clothing. Depressing as it may seem on the surface, a black palate is both practical and flattering. And frankly, black goes with everything. Win-win, I always thought. Working at Novella, however, I was alarmed by my stylish colleague, Liat, whose brazen wardrobe appears effortless and playful — and terrifying when I envision it on myself.

For the past six years, my new year’s resolution was to methodically incorporate at least one item of colour into my wardrobe. I’d start off slowly by adding just a pop of colour in limited doses, so as not to overwhelm my psyche. So far I have veered into white and light grey — it has been a trying process. New year’s resolutions often become distant memories. Each morning, in a rush and with excuses, I end up wearing black and hoping texture will somehow spice things up. So obviously, the office took one look at me and decided that my funeral-like appearance required an upgrade. So for our second Trading Places article, Liat and I partnered up to revisit basics and wear outfits with colour — even yellow.

DAYTIME OUTFIT

Michelle: The average person simply cannot wear yellow and not look like Big Bird. But, for Liat’s sake, I really tried to like this top. I was pleasantly surprised to see how flounce sleeves could make the yellowness seem intentional and I liked how they added some texture and a playful vibe, which, to be honest, I don’t have. Next, I tried on the gingham trousers, which at first glance reminded me of a picnic table. I have to say though, that these pants were both soft and stretchy and on-point with this season’s trends. Incorporating some black made me feel like I could actually wear them. In general, my daily uniform includes black skinny jeans, and I noticed how much more mobility I had with these pants. I was fresh, youthful and a literal beam of sunlight. Unsurprisingly, I did end up buying the pants to wear with more black. The yellow will have to wait till 2018.

Liat: As a fashion blogger, my biggest fear is looking boring. And for that reason, the oversized sweater didn’t look appealing to me. My first thought was: This is not my cup of tea. But at the same time, I was curious to see how it will make me feel when I pull it off. As for the jeans, I was satisfied with what Michelle picked for me. I adore the fringe details on the buttom because of the uniqueness they add. The boyfriend fit along with the oversized sweater made me rethink my fancy style, especially when it comes to my busy unglamorous life as a busy mom. I love colours, prints, and feminine details like ruffles and lace, but for a casual weekend look, like a day with my kids at the park, I can never go wrong with such a comfy outfit.

NIGHTTIME OUTFIT

Michelle: I’m just going to start off by saying that I hate dresses because they require a certain femininity that I do not possess. Rompers or jumpsuits are just their awkward and unappealing half siblings because when you have to go to the bathroom, ain’t nobody got time for all that work! Needless to say, this romper was a challenge, both physically and emotionally. It was also a full-on floral print with a ribbon tie back, paired with a Supreme Deluxe pizza purse. There was a lot going on. My petite frame was fully submerged and drowning in colour, pattern, and print, and quickly moving through the five stages of grief. Initially, I was in denial thinking, “maybe this works.” I quickly moved to stage two and three, realizing that I had put both legs in one leg of the romper but bargaining with myself that no one would realize my error. I then became depressed, realizing that colour was not for me and finally accepting that only Liat would ever be able to look cool in this outfit. This outfit was way too far out of my comfort zone.

Liat: The black top featuring a built-in corset belt was extremely comfortable and it’s definitely something I see myself wearing with a colourful flowy skirt or high waisted pants. I love the idea that this corset is already attached to the shirt, which saved me the time of figuring out what to wear. Plus, it’s super trendy this season. Pairing it with black skinny jeans and oversized shirt makes it too casual for my fashionista soul, especially as an evening look, since I am the type of person who is always trying to mix things up and create an unexpected combination. Also I was afraid that that the button up shirt looked quite boyish. Even so, it’s not an outfit I’d normally pick for going out. But I must say it looks great together and I am willing to adopt it as a day look. I was really satisfied with what Michelle picked out for me and I think it’s also flattering to my body shape.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Michelle: Despite my pessimistic attitude toward all things colourful or peppy, I have to admit that I had a lot of fun with Liat and this exercise. It made me realize that society does not care what you wear as long as you own it. I learnt to be less anxious about colour and more willing to try something new, so next time I see colour on a rack, I will at least give it a shot. But, I am not sure if I’d ever wear yellow again, so don’t hold your breath.

Liat: As a fashion addict, I am always willing to go on a shopping spree. For me this experience was pure fun. I noticed how I am always looking for outfits that will let my individuality pop up, which leads to a closet that lacks basic pieces like plain t shirts or simple black jeans. I realized that I need to increase the causal department in my closet. It also made me realize that I have too many girly dresses, which I got just because I couldn’t leave them hanging in the store. At the end of the day, I bought the black corset top Michelle offered me because of it versatility.

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Parisian Picnic with Grey Goose’s Le Grand Fizz

Recently at Grey Goose’s beautiful Sunset Soirée, Novella had a chance to meet Chef Justin Kent, previously of Alain Passard’s 3-Michelin starred L’Arpègeand chat about French cuisine and its often overlooked adherence to simplicity and the quality of French produce. But more importantly and — and this is no jab at the chef’s personality — more memorably, we had a chance to eat his food. And I must say that Chef Kent’s Parisian picnic-style dishes were a testimony to Grey Goose’s ability to create and spot simple elegance and tastefulness. “Grey Goose approached me because the concept of what I do — farm-to-table — is much in line with their philosophy of field-to-bottle. I wanted to [make pairings] that touch on some of the key notes of Grey Goose and its terroir,” he said. Though those prone to hyperbole might suggest that the pairing of Grey Goose Le Grand Fizz — with which everyone was eventually awash — and Chef Kent’s farm salad and poulet au moutarde was indeed the culinary equivalent of being taken on a nice ride through France’s Picardy region in a 1950 Citroen 2cv — where Grey Goose’s wheat come from —, I myself will go only so far to say that the pairing was a form of alchemy in which scenes of Paris became food and drink.

Luckily for those of us who cannot make it to Paris or Picardy anytime soon, Grey Goose and Chef Kent were kind enough to share their recipes with us. Below are your gateway to effervescent Paris and Picardy and their French effervescence (with some personal notes from yours truly).

Grey Goose Le Grand Fizz

  • 1 & 1/2 parts Grey Goose vodka
  • 1 part St-Germain elderflower liqueur
  • 2 parts chilled soda water
  • 1/2 freshly squeezed lime juice (or approximately 2 wedges)

To switch things up a bit, maintain the ratios and replace Grey Goose with Grey Good L’Orange (or Le Citron) and the lime juice with freshly squeezed orange juice (or lemon juice). You can also try it with Grey Goose Cherry Noir — just replace the lime juice with lemon. The only rule here is to keep things simple. Use good quality ice — the clearer the better — and always use a jigger and let Grey Goose do its thing.

  1. Build ice into an oversized cabernet wine glass. More ice than you initially think seem appropriate.
  2. Add Grey Goose vodka and lime juice and top with St-Germain and soda water (in that order).
  3. Garnish with fresh lime wedges and a swanky Grey Goose stirrer if you have one.

Farm Salad with Goat Cheese & Champagne Vinaigrette

  • 1 fennel bulb (halved and cored)
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 small Chioggia beet (blanched and peeled)
  • 3 large radishes
  • 1 endive
  • 1 granny smith apple (sliced)
  • 80g arugula
  • 1 tablespoon of tarragon leaves
  • 1 tablespoon of dill
  • 1 tablespoon flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 1 tablespoon chives (chopped)
  • 1 tablespoon champagne wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 85g fresh goat cheese (crumbled)
  • This recipe makes 4 servings

The Chioggia beet is a variety straight out of the Beatles’s Sgt. Pepper’s. The candy pink and white striped beet is sweeter than the usual variety and does not bleed as much, which is great since red beets may very well overwhelm the rest of the salad with its colors. But if Chioggia is not available at your nearby farmers’ market or grocery store, you can of course replace it with a regular old beet. Or if you want the bright colors, try using watermelon radishes — just make sure to use a little less of the other radishes. Or, do like I did and take it out entirely. Nobody will notice if you don’t tell a soul. It’ll be your little secret that will tickle you when the guests get on your nerves, like, “Little did they know…” Do Mr. Burns’s evil fingers and move onto the other vegetables. Finally, near the end of the summer, try switching red radishes with black ones. They are more pungent and a bit spicier and the charcoal skin adds great color to the salad.

  1. Blanch the beets in simmering water with the skin on until easily able to be pierced with a knife.
  2. Let the beets cool. Once cool enough to handle, remove the skin of the beets with your hands. It should slide off.
  3. Using a mandolin, thinly slice the fennel, carrot, beet, and radishes and transfer to a large bowl. Add the endive, arugula, tarragon, dill, parsley, and chives.
  4. In a small bowl, whisk the champagne vinegar with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Add the dressing and half of the goat cheese, and toss gently.
  5. Transfer the salad to plates and garnish with the remaining goat cheese.

Poulet au Moutarde 

 

  • 10 chicken thighs (skin on, deboned)
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 cup cream
  • 150g grain mustard
  • 150g lardons
  • 1/2 banana shallot (diced)
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme
  • Fresh parsley (chopped for garnish)
  • Salt & pepper (to taste)
  • This recipe makes 5 servings

Use a thick bottomed pan. Cast iron skillet works well here. Some suggest oven roasting the chicken in the oven, but it’s hot in the summer and who has time for that. Poulet au moutarde (mustard chicken doesn’t sound as appetizing for some reason — the French really know how to make everything chic) is a classic and even if everything doesn’t go 100% right, it’s hard to muck up. Use good chicken (organic, kosher, air-chilled, because we are about that good life), good grain mustard (that Grey Poupon, though Canadian brand, Kozlik’s is also very good), and fresh vegetables, and you’re set. Because I’m a sucker for all things pickled, I like the poulet au moutarde avec pickled slaw. Smitten Kitchen has a great and easy recipe and you can get it here. Finally, though this may not really be that haute-cuisine in spirit, always have a loaf of sourdough or a baguette to soak up the sauce.

  1. Season chicken thighs with salt and pepper.
  2. In a pan on medium-high heat, sear the chicken thighs, skin side down in oil until crisp and golden brown. Flip and sear on the other side until lightly caramelized.
  3. Remove the chicken thighs from the pan and set aside on a plate.
  4. Add lardons to the pan and cook until crisp.
  5. Add shallots to the pan and cook until translucent.
  6. Add the grain mustard and stir for 30 seconds being careful not to let it burn.
  7. Deglaze the pan with white win, bring to a simmer and reduce by half.
  8. Add cream and bring to a simmer.
  9. Add the smoked paprika.
  10. Place the chicken thighs back in the sauce and cook on medium to medium-low heat, covered, until fork tender.
  11. Remove from the sauce and place on to the plate to serve.
  12. Spoon sauce over the top of the chicken and garnish with chopped parsley.

Riz au Lait with Caramel Beurre Salé

  • 1 liter whole milk
  • 200g risotto rice (carnaroli is best but arborio will do)
  • 200g sugar
  • Zest of 2 lemons
  • 200g heavy cream
  • 500g sugar (for the caramel beurre salé)
  • 400g heavy cream (for the caramel beurre salé)
  • 125g salted butter (for the caramel beurre salé)
  • This recipe makes 6~8 servings

Riz au lait is rice pudding. More or less. But instead of chocolate or cinnamon powder, here we have the caramel beurre salé, a fancier accoutrement to be sure. But, lucky for us, not that much more difficult nor time consuming! I recommend the carnaroli instead of the arborio because it is starchier and will give you a creamier result. I’m used to adding a bit of nutmeg to my rice pudding, and I’m sure it won’t harm the recipe here. In fact, I believe that the nutmeg may go very well with Grey Goose Espresso Martini.

  1. Bring milk, rice, and sugar to a simmer and cook for 20-25 minutes until the rice is cooked through.
  2. Add lemon zest and allow mixture to cool.
  3. Whip heavy cream and fold into the riz au lait, set aside.
  4. To make the caramel sauce, heat cream so that it is warm, just before simmering and set aside.
  5. In a small pot, caramelize sugar to a med-dark amber color.
  6. Slowly add in the cream to the caramel, whisking consistently, then remove from the heat once well blended.
  7. Add butter and stir well.
  8. To serve, pour cooled riz au lait into individual sized ramekins and top with caramel sauce.

Grey Goose Espresso Martini 

  • 1 &1/2 parts Grey Goose Vodka
  • 1 part single origin espresso
  • 3/4 parts premium coffee liqueur
  • Good chocolate

This is the finisher. Your guests had their salad and chicken and they’re just digging into the rich riz au lait, thinking something along the lines of I’m dead, and you come out with this concoction of smooth blow of elegance and power.This delicious cocktail wakes up the drinker and makes them happy at the same time. What more can one ask? Maybe a take-out box if there’s any of that salad left. But otherwise, nothing.

  1. Shake hard and long.
  2. Double strain and garnish with grated chocolate.

There you are, folks, the solution to your summer lunch, dinner, and picnic menu problem. Don’t mind the beautiful photo of the rock by the beach with perfectly photogenic charcuterie, cheese, and roast chicken, and absurd ratio between baguette and other foods. I put it there because it’s pretty and maybe it will inspire you to seek out a bit of the French-picnic chic this summer. When preparing the food seem a bit daunting, remember the perfect wood picnic basket. That the Grey Goose is the first on the list is by no means an accident — it’s meant to enliven and rejuvenate your mind, body, and soul as you spend the long summer day out in the sun. Keep the food and drinks simple, spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your friends and family. 

Father’s Day Cocktail Recipes

There are many reasons to make a cocktail on Father’s Day. Maybe you’re cooking the father in your life a steak dinner and need a last bit of panache to make it really special. Maybe you need a delicious thing of liquid courage to call  him and say, Happy Father’s Day. Or maybe you’re yourself a father and want to celebrate your parental responsibilities. Whatever the reason, one thing is clear: the cocktail should not take more than a couple of minutes and a few ingredients to whip up fresh as needed. Whether you’re playing catch with your son with a drink in hand or whether you’re imagining the impact of never having played catch with your dad, Novella’s Torontonian bartender connects got you covered.

Figures’s Mixologist James Bailey’s ‘Dad and Jokey’

Ingredients:

1.5oz Monkey Shoulder Scotch

.75oz Lemon Juice

.75oz Rosemary Syrup

1oz Orange Juice

Ginger Beer to top

Garnish: Lemon or lime wheel, fresh rosemary

Pour all liquid ingredients into a Collins glass, filled with ice. Stir and garnish with a fresh rosemary sprig and lemon or lime wheel. Serve immediately.

Parts and Labour’s Chantelle Gabino-inspired Simple — No Muddling of Sugar Cubes – Classic Old Fashioned

Old Fashioned made with Bulleit Whiskey

Ingredients:

2oz rye, bourbon, or peated scotch, if you’re feeling a bit adventurous

1/2 oz of simple syrup

Dashes of aromatic bitters — Bittered Sling’s Kensington Bitter, if you can get it, and Angostura, if you can’t.

One large cube of good, cold ice.

Before starting the drink itself, make sure you have good ice. Keep the ice away from frozen meats and vegetables, because the ice will otherwise take on their odors, which may very well ruin the cocktail. Keep in mind, simple is best but simple takes good quality ingredients to truly shine. Now, let’s make that drink. Make sure the receptacle — an Old Fashioned glass, if possible — is cold. Combine simple syrup and dashes of bitters in the glass. Add one large cube of ice — or enough ice to fill the glass – and stir to mix. Add whiskey and stir until the liquid levels with the ice cube. Before serving, add a small splash of oil from an orange zest and, if you’re so inclined, throw in the zest. (Less is more here as many people find the pith of the orange to be entirely distasteful.)