Director Robert Lieberman on commercials, science fiction and his CDGA nomination

Lieberman on the set of The Expanse.

American director Robert Lieberman is no stranger to accolades. Having directed commercials for 30 years, Lieberman has been awarded 29 Cleo Awards, has attended Cannes three times, and won the Director’s Guild Award for commercials the first year it was given. His resume is impressive, his experience extensive, but for Lieberman, receiving a nomination from the Canadian Director’s Guild Awards is an honour, and an entirely new one at that.

“I’m a new Canadian,” says Lieberman. “I’ve only been here for about a decade. I’m honoured to be recognized by my peers in the country I’ve chosen, especially given the competition.”

Lieberman has been nominated for the CDGA award in television direction for his work on the science fiction series The Expanse. The show follows a United Nations executive, a detective, and a ship officer uncovering a conspiracy that threatens the peace and survival of the human race in a colonized solar system. Shohreh Aghdashloo plays the executive, Thomas Jane plays the detective, and Steven Strait plays the officer. The show is based off of the book series by James S. A. Corey, a pen name for writers Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck.

Lieberman was initially a fan of the book, and joined the television adaptation halfway through its first season. “The show they were approaching wasn’t the show I had in mind when I read the book,” explains Lieberman. “[The showrunners] agreed with me. We decided to revamp the look of the show.”

Changing the look of a show partway through the first season is risky, but the creative team behind the show liked Lieberman’s vision for the show and ran with it. It paid off. The show is now entering its third season and boasts an 85% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

Lieberman describes his take on the world created in the book as crowded — real estate is at a premium in space, so everywhere you look there’s stuff. It’s different than the cold, minimalist space so iconically portrayed in movies such as 2001: A Space Odyssey. It’s realer, it’s gritty, it’s not very different from our current reality.

“They wouldn’t fill up cubic yards of oxygen just for the sake of filling it up,” says Lieberman. “I recommended they fill the sets with gack [set decoration] so that it all looked grungy and worked. For the episode I’m nominated for, the set was called the Winnebago of space crafts.”

Lieberman didn’t start out directing television, and didn’t even start out wanting to be a director. His first foray into the entertainment industry was as an actor. While growing up in Buffalo, Lieberman was one of the few working child actors in the area. In University, however, his goals shifted.

“I started to realize I was more of a control freak than I thought. I didn’t like being told what to do and I like telling people what to do. Directing is the perfect profession,” jokes Lieberman.

His heart was in the arts, but Lieberman says his aptitudes were pointing towards mathematics. There are a couple of ways to marry the two and directing is one sure way to do so. The combination of technology, planning, number crunching, and coupling an artistic eye with a logical one made the choice for career clear to Lieberman. And the first big destination that choice brought Lieberman to was Hallmark commercials, where he made a name for himself in the industry. “I love stories about humankind and interaction between people,” he says, “I imbue my films with really in-depth characters.”

Lieberman does bring up a good point: no matter the genre, the stories we are invested in are always about people. If we have no characters, no relationships, nothing human to identify with, then engagement and enjoyment become that much more difficult. Science fiction is no different. While the setting is concerned with technology, machinery and futurism, the story is always revolved around the people within these worlds. But what Lieberman says also draws him to the genre is the aspect of a blank canvas.

On another set for The Expanse.

“You have to invent everything,” says Lieberman. “It’s challenging to create worlds that don’t exist.”

Lieberman’s creativity is clear in The Expanse, but also shows in his eclectic body of work. Looking into his ear future, Lieberman shows no sign of becoming pigeon-holed into a particular genre or position.

“I’m doing a package of Toyota commercials,” says Lieberman. “I’m writing a personal play I’d originally intended as a movie, but I decided is better on stage. I’m writing three things simultaneously — there’s a sci-fi YA novel, which I hope turns into the next Harry Potter.”

With projects scheduled for the coming years and an inexhaustible work ethic, it’s no wonder award nominations such as the CDGA keep heading Robert Lieberman’s way, and despite the “I’m just happy to be nominated” phrase being a bit of a cliche, Lieberman did tell me, very seriously, that he is happy just to be nominated.

You can visit Robert Lieberman’s website here.

Novella’s October Art Guide 2017

Hamilton by Cosmo Campbell. Image Source.

For the month of October, we’re all about context and interpretation. The way we see objects, the way we interact with those around us, the way we recall events and count stories — these things are particular to each person. We all operate from within our own sets of understanding, from context our brain supplies and events filtered through our consciousness. Perspective is such a funny thing. It can be so ingrained in us and yet a single idea or an image can upset it and alter our understanding. We invite you to interact with our choices of art exhibition this month to engage with a little perspective destabilization.

NORVAL MORRISSEAU & CHRISTIAN MORRISSEAU (SEPTEMBER 21ST — NOVEMBER 5TH)

Legendary Ojibwe artist Norval Morrisseau passed away in 2007, but his legacy continues on in his artwork and his children. His youngest son, Christian Morrisseau, an accomplished artist in his own right, takes the knowledge and traditions his father taught him and adds his own perspective and interpretation on them. This exhibition, featuring work from both Norval and Christian, will be displayed in three different galleries inside the Distillery District: The Stone Distillery Gallery, The Cooperage Space, and a pop-up gallery at 30 Parliament Street. So, they’re making it easy for you to take in some truly incredible art and to experience a cross-generational tradition.

Learn more information here.

AT HOME WITH MONSTERS (SEPTEMBER 30TH — JANUARY 7TH)

I’m of the opinion that Mexican filmmaker Guillermo del Toro is a master world builder, and the chance to look through his personal collections of art, artefacts, and props is not something I want to pass up. This exhibition serves as a window into del Toro’s inspiration and life, and is thematically, rather than chronologically, organized. There will be an assumedly eclectic mixture of genre and medium, all things that del Toro says have inspired him to create his impressive body of work. While the exhibition will run at the AGO until January, what better time to visit some monsters than October?

More information here.

NOCTURNAL TOURIST (OCTOBER 5TH — 19TH)

If you’ve ever felt strange inside a gas station, an empty school, an airport terminal, or a parking garage, you’ve engaged with the idea of liminal spaces — places our brains have hardwired for a certain context and when they are removed from that context, the image is destabilized. They can also be transitional places, as in somewhere you wind up in on the way to a particular destination. Liminal spaces fascinate me, and if you feel the same way, you’re going to want to see Cosmo Campbell’s photography exhibition at The Black Cat Artspace. Campbell photographed places and objects that are normally busy during the daytime at night, switching the focus from people to the object or places themselves and changing their contexts. If you have no idea what I was talking about with liminal spaces, then consider this exhibit an introduction.

More information here.

AN UNNATURAL HISTORY (OCTOBER 5TH — NOVEMBER 2ND)

This upcoming group show at the Etsy Street Team Gallery aims to bend fact and fiction and question what is natural and what is unnatural. Artists Kathryn Bell, Kristen D’Aquila, Duncan Wilder, Lavina Hanachiuc, Mar Hester, Holly McClellan, Judith Pudden, Kest Schwartzman, Rosemary Stehlik, Tosca Taran, Pati Tozer, Elaine Whittaker, Ele Willoughby, and Cynthia Winters all bring their own interpretations of ideas based in imagination but supported by fact. If you think made up stuff is strange, you have no idea how strange science and math can be. (And if you want to get extra weird, there’s a reception on Friday the 13th.)

More information here.

SPACES OF PASSAGE (OCTOBER 5TH — NOVEMBER 5TH)

Jean-Luc Lindsay’s paintings are exercises in perspective in two different ways: first is the medium itself. Lindsay’s stark realism is so skillful that, at a first glance, I did think one was a photograph. Of course, upon closer inspection, the painting technique is clear. The subject matter, however, is also worth a double take. Lindsay’s seemingly mundane subjects are revisited with artistic detail, revealing patterns and qualities we wouldn’t see in scenery we pass by everyday on the sidewalk. Something like a door propped up against a fence takes on new meaning and warrants new considerations. Lindsay’s paintings will be at Project Gallery all month long.

More information here.

Review: Maui Moisture Haircare

Photo via Pinterest.

For some people, there is an immediate prejudice against drugstore hair care products. Much like with makeup, some consider affordable drugstore brands to be lesser somehow than what can be bought specially at a much higher price. The questions supposedly always comes down to quality and effectiveness. It’s a seemingly simple formula: the more expensive the product, the better it has to work, right?

I can already hear many of you protesting because, of course, that isn’t true. As someone who has tried higher-end, pricier hair care versus more affordable brands, the real difference always comes down to personal preferences and finding products that work for your particular issue.

If you’re me, that issue is having very fine, very straight, limp, damaged hair.

This isn’t to say my hair can be low maintenance: it takes two hours to air dry, doesn’t get very frizzy, and, in fact, doesn’t really do anything except sit limply on my head like a wet pillowcase. And over the course of my life thus far, I’ve tried tons of different products all promising various miraculous things for my lifeless locks. I’ve tried volumizing shampoos and conditioners, mousses, volumizing sprays, texturizing sprays, and, on one memorable occasion, hot rollers. Nothing has ever worked as miraculously as promised. Results were usually lacklustre at best, and most of those sprays and mousses just left my hair flat and crunchy.

But I keep trying things, and through these trials and tribulations, I’ve found a couple of holy grail products (Verb’s volumizing spray and IGK’s dry shampoo for example) and some exciting new finds, like the Thicken & Restore collection from Maui Moisture.

When I had the opportunity to try something from Maui Moisture, I went in with medium expectations based on past experiences. The range promises shiny, healthy hair with volume — a highly sought-after, ideal combination for someone with hair like mine. It’s a lot to claim, but any hair care brand out there does its best to boast in order to stand out on the shelves. But here’s the thing: after using the Thicken & Restore + Bamboo Fibres Shampoo, Conditioner and Blow Out Mist, I can say this: these guys also didn’t give me immediate, mind-blowing results, but they did work well enough for me.

To start, some of the primary ingredients in both products are aloe juice and coconut water, an interesting combination that gives the products a pretty heady and intense smell, which I actually love but could put off others. While there are unnatural ingredients also in the products, I was keen to try a hair care product that did contain natural ingredients high up on its content list.

So, the ingredients were looking good, the price point was right (about $10.99 a pop) but then I had to test it out. For a few weeks I’ve been using the shampoo and conditioner and then, when I have blow-dry days (about half the time), the spray.

And no, I didn’t have a miracle moment with suddenly amazing hair. It had to take about a week of use, but I did see a bit of life come into my own boring hair. After about two weeks of use, I felt like my hair had movement, when its default state has been that wet pillowcase thing we talked about earlier. That was kind of a big deal for me, to have a product actually work a little bit instead of not working at all.

My true positive result came at about the two week mark, when I was satisfied with my hair that day enough not to curl it with a hot tool, my go-to to give my hair any kind of shape and bounce. That isn’t to say I didn’t style my hair with hot tools the next day, but it felt good to skip it once. And another weird effect is that my day-two hair now rocks.

The Maui Moisture products did not make my hair magically thicker, but they did make it have a little bounce while moisturizing it really well. Since I do style it with hot tools frequently and have dyed it many times in the past, my poor hair is seriously damaged and always crying out for help. It was really nice to find more products that balance moisture without being heavy on fine hair. You kind of get the best of both worlds with these.

So, yes, I’m sold on the Maui Moisture Thicken & Restore + Bamboo Fibres stuff. It worked really well for me, the chronic flat-hair-er of Canada, and I would recommend trying it to anyone else with similar hair issues. Especially for that price point, as it did work more effectively on my head than some other salon products I’ve tried did. Not that I’ll name brands or anything. Just know they didn’t work out. Shhhhh.

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A Class By Herself: A Conversation with Actor, Writer, and Producer Kelly McCormack

Kelly McCormack is not an overnight sensation.

Such a thing doesn’t even exist, not really. Not even in this age of instant fame via Instagram. For people like Kelly, it’s about a lifetime of work that gets them to a point where success is suddenly found. The actor, writer, and producer who stars in the third season of the hit sci-fi show Killjoys, is filming a feature film she penned for next year and recently travelled to Taiwan for an opera. A quick internet search has Kelly showing up everywhere, but as she told me over the September long weekend, her wild amount of on-the-go projects lends itself to years of diligent work.

If you were looking for a Cinderella story, this both is and is not it.

Natasha Grodzinski: 2017 has been and continues to be a big year for you. What do you have on the go right now?

Kelly McCormack: From my perspective, I’ve been so busy for so long working on a lots of different projects. You put irons in the fire and it just so happens that 2017 was the year they all exhibited. It’s been a bit hilarious because my acting career, my writing career and my producing career have all coalesced for this one year of bananas. I’m on the show Killjoys which is a huge deal. I went to the audition — it was the first audition of the year, I booked it, and that kind of changed my year, because I was shooting the series from January to May. The TV show I produced for the CBC, The Neddeaus of Duqesne Island came out. We found out we got to moved forward with my feature film Sugar Daddy and I went to Taiwan for this opera. It’s been a little bit absurd, but amazing. I’m a total workaholic — I get stressed out when I have time off to relax. So, it’s been a lot of fun.

NG: Being idle isn’t something you do well?

KM: Oh my god, no. Laughs. I say that so honestly. When I was seven years old, they asked me to do a project on a superpower I wanted. There were lots of powers I wanted, but when I was seven I wrote I didn’t want to have to sleep because I wanted to get more work done. When I was younger one of my uncles told me you sleep for half your life. I was so devastated by that. I don’t do holidays well. The best kind of holiday is how I went to Taiwan for this opera, where I have to perform a bunch but can explore in between. I can deal with moments of high pressure and I feel like that’s when I’m the most myself and the least stressed. You know, I was the girl who rearranged her room every month and had all these decisions about what she was going to do. All of my bucket lists were books. That’s it.

NG: I would say that’s working out well for you now.

KM: Yes, I suppose. I’ve always wanted to be an actor. I started my academic life of writing in university. Producing I just love. I love putting pieces together and making stuff happen. But those were all done in the service of telling more stories and getting busier. In my film Sugar Daddy I play a musician as I also came up through music. I didn’t mean for it to boil over like this but it’s great. Like I said, I don’t do holidays well. I like being able to turn off my phone for  a day, but then I think, “Oh god, there’s all these things I should’ve been doing.”

NG: You touched on one of those aspects of storytelling I wanted to talk about, which is starting your own production company.

KM: Well, it kind of came out of nowhere. About three years ago I was supposed to be in this play, but it fell through. I did have this sweet part-time job at Seneca College. You know I always say artists live or die by their part-time jobs. People are always trading advice and secrets.This one was sweet, it was the holy grail of part-time jobs, but I got laid off there and a bunch of things just fell though. I had a super busy summer, then my slate was wiped completely clean. I was so stressed because it wasn’t where I saw things going. Then Ingrid Veninger, a very well-known DIY filmmaker in Canada, was doing this challenge for filmmakers to make a movie for only $1000. I was hanging with my friend Kristian Bruun, we were just talking about it and I thought, okay, screw it, I’ll write a feature film, the two of us will produce it and we’l put our friends in it. It was this really sweaty, insane summer exercise. I wrote it in two weeks, we shot it in two weeks and we produced the whole thing for $1000.

NG: Holy god.

KM: Yeah, it was crazy. The way that we cast it, with a budget like that, the more creatively involved you have to keep people. Everyone thinks you have to call in all these favours — don’t get favours, get people who are so hungry to make something happen. The way we assembled this cast and crew was like this: I asked Kristian, “Who would you not make a movie without?” He said, this person. Then we asked that person the same question and so on. We assembled this ride or die clan of people. Kristian and I didn’t sleep for two weeks, I sublet my apartment to pay the $1000, because even with a low budget like that it’s a lot of money. We produced this film called Play the Film. It’s a comedy, it’s really weird. It’s about these actors who aren’t booking work so they put on this play. Very meta about our lives, you know. It goes horribly wrong and they end up improvisation stage and making the most offensive play every to be put before an audience. It ended up doing really well and went to festivals around the world. It happened that I needed to put a company name on this film. I have this super righteous dog named Floyd and for some reason we call him Floyder. I wanted to immortalize him so I called the company Floyder Films.

Of course as the acting, writing and producing are going well, I’m thinking, what else can I do? I’ve started thinking about how I can grow the company and about better ways to monetize my ability to bring people together who love to tell stories and hopefully bring in some business-minded people, and hopefully, you know, just be a really powerful CEO one day. Laughs.

NG: One step closer to world domination.

KM: Yeah! I can say these things in interviews, like over the phone you know I’m not saying it in a different way, but I’ll see myself on paper saying, “I want to change the world!” I think, “Yeah, I sound really full of myself.” I’m sure lots of men say stuff like that and don’t worry about it.

At the same time, I am an outspoken feminist. I care about the representation issue in the industry. I care about telling stories that represent women and casting and hiring people of colour. The impetus from wanting to be successful with my production company is because I want to invigorate and hire people who may not normally get that opportunity, I want be a change in the industry. I’ve started trying to option books, which is a really fun thing. You get to read your favourite books and stalk the author and publishing company to try and convince them to give you the rights. Doing that is fun. I’m a big sci-fi reader and am always thinking of how I can make this story into a movie.

NG: Science fiction is a really fantastic space for progression.

KM: For sure! And you have all these people watching Star Trek or Star Wars where there are futures where race and gender don’t mean a thing. Mothers are realized to be at the centre of societies. I was finishing Dune over the weekend and mothers who reproduce and populate civilization are gods. There’s this future that we could be heading towards but it’s like, come on people! Sci-fi’s already there! That’s what great bout being on a show like Killjoys. I get scripts for my character and you don’t get the same ick factor as you do reading other scripts, when you’re thinking, “Ugh this is so gendered and so mildly racist.” It’s a wonderful space.

NG: Is that a direction you want your company to go in?

KM: I do talk about this a lot, about making movies without gender pain, without the ideas of the expectations we put on masculinity and femininity. I have a documentary I’m working on, and another series, and they centre around that topic.

NG: In your own writing, you have the film Sugar Daddy, which had a very familiar concept to me, having heard about it at school, but I wanted to talk about writing the stories you want to see.

KM: Well, Sugar Daddy is, first and foremost, about this up-and-coming musician. And she’s trying to make it. She’s broke and has yet to cross that threshold where she’s making money or getting noticed. Even without the sugar daddy, that’s not a story we see often. There are so many movies about artists trying to make it, and they’re all men! There’s this obsession with the male artist and the tortured, struggling musician. We’ve seen so many movies like that.

[Sugar daddies, at the basest definition, are rich men, usually older, who pay younger women to date them.]

She learns to package herself for all these other men in different ways. Then she learns how to package herself for the already sexualized music industry. It’s about the commodity of art and self-worth. It’s about sex as a commodity and generally the sexual politics that every single woman has to negotiate on a daily basis. You know, “Oh, this guy bought me a drink, do I need to talk to him now,” or, “This guy bought me dinner on a date, do I have the sleep with him now?” The things that half the population has to think about on an hourly basis is really what the film is about. It’s told through the eyes of this artist who is then regurgitating it into her music.

When I was in New York and had a million part-time jobs and all my friends were trying to make it on Broadway, a bunch of my friends did this. This was years ago, before it became the cultural phenomenon. My first reaction was disgust, but it took five or six years of being a producer in the industry and going to these parties to see how you don’t really have a choice in being commodified.You have to go through that stuff anyway.

NG: When you’re looking at roles you haven’t written, what are you looking for?

KM: In general, the type of roles that inspire me, whether I get offered them or not, are depictions of women we don’t see a lot. I like playing characters that have endgames, motivations and locations that are not not involved with them falling in love with a man, though I’m not saying I wouldn’t do a romantic comedy. Laughs. Like Zeph, for example, the character I play on Killjoys, she’s a science nerd. That’s her passion, her focus, her drive. In Sugary Daddy, she’s an artist, that’s her drive.

In terms of types of characters, I want to play the most opposite of the one I just played. I would love to have a career where someone calls me a character actor. I don’t really have an interest in defining this “Kelly brand” and delivering this ongoing character of myself. I became an actor because I love pretending to be other people. I’ve had some opportunities to play bizarre characters and I hope when I get to put them together, people don’t recognize me part to part.

NG: One of the weird characters I had to ask you about, and I watched the whole thing last week, is on The Neddeus of Duqesne Island.

KM: Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. That show is probably one of the most proud things I’ve been a part of in my life. I produced that series and it’s written by Aaron Schroeder who came to me a couple of years ago with this crazy idea of making a faux NFB documentary. We shot it in the fall, and I also had the opportunity to be in the series as Eloida, the demonic twin. It was so much fun to be in. The whole point of the series was to mimic that ultra-naturalism from the documentaries, so it’s not about what you’re saying, it’s about the action and what you’re doing with your hands in the moment. The director Sam [Zvibleman] was really good at making sure the actors were not performing. I had this badass 70s costume that made the twins looks like the twins from The Shining. We went up into the woods in the fall and made this weird-ass show. The director would have us do the scene over and over again and improvise and by the end of the day, it didn’t feel like we were performing.

But yes, she was weird character. The dialect was weird and the way she stood was weird. She’s another interesting character where her motivation is actually world domination. That is Pinky and the Brain right there. Her interests are simple: she wants to rule the island and kill her brother. And going back to the roles I want to play, I don’t want to recognizable. I don’t want them to say, “Oh that’s Kelly McCormack.” I want them to say, “Who’s that weirdo? Oh, it’s Kelly!” Laughs. “Who’s that weirdo?” Those are the roles I want to play.

NG: If there were to be a brand, that would be it.

KM: Yeah!

NG: So with all the excitement this year, and with everything happening, where do you see these projects going?

KM: Oh my gosh good question. You know, as busy as it is, I have a constant fear that it will just end. As great as all this is, the upkeep is something that will require all of my energy. Killjoys got picked up for two more seasons, which is incredible. I don’t know what the means for me, but I didn’t die at the end of season three, so…

NG: That’s always a good thing in sci-fi. I didn’t die!

KM: Exactly, so who knows? Sugar Daddy is in the works and I have a couple of other TV shows I’m writing and pitching. I’m always upping the bar for myself. My standard and bucket list is growing. In terms of what’s next… I really want to focus on my production company and the types of films I’m developing. Because for me, I always say, I wanted to be an actor when I was seven and having this life of art was a dream. Then it became my life. It suddenly happens where you work hard and don’t have to do any more part-time jobs, you’re just supporting yourself off of your art. To me, that’s making it. That’s it.

Interview has been condensed for print. You can follow Kelly on Twitter here and Instagram hereContinue following our fashion and lifestyle coverage on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Novella’s September Art Guide

Fault Line by Phil Irish. Image source.

In times of crisis, art becomes more necessary than ever. It can be a direct response, a backlash, a coping mechanism, or an escape. In a time when it seems as though most news is bad news, we invite you to engage in some of the finest art exhibitions the city has to offer this month. Here, you will find works that will make you laugh, make you think, or take you somewhere else. Consider this not a break from the world’s problems, but a reminder of other things that come with being human.

hahahahuh (AUGUST 31ST — SEPTEMBER 23RD)

Tessar Lo’s artwork fits perfectly into the current cultural brain: a little strange, a little funny, and with a lot hidden underneath the surface. Lo employs images of mundane objects — a toy, a piece of fruit, etc. — and renders them with potential to become metaphoric symbols of life in the modern age. The Indonesian-born artist’s paintings exist in the space between humorous and mysterious, between utter bewilderment and the urge to make a joke. This is the same dichotomy that exists on our own mediums for expression, most clearly demonstrated on Twitter, where the first reactions to bad news or shocking events are shock, rage, and dark humour. Look to Project Gallery to see Lo’s work for yourself this month.

Learn more here.

ANNIE POOTOOGOOK (SEPTEMBER 2ND — FEBRUARY 11TH)

The newest exhibition at the McMichael Canadian art Collection is a feature on the work of award-winning Inuk artist Annie Pootookgook and her influence on her peers. The exhibition will feature a number of Pootoogook’s drawings as well as works by Shuvinai Ashoona, Jutai Toonoo, Ohotaq Mikkigak, Siassie Kenneally, and Itee Pootoogook. This examination of contemporary Inuk art recognizes Annie Pootoogook as the catalyst in opening up new conversations for Inuk artists and new streams of expression. While the McMichael Collection is all the way up in Kleinburg, the drive is worth it to see Pootoogook’s wistful and wonderful works, and an in-depth look into contemporary Inuk artists.

Learn more here.

SKATE GIRLS OF KABUL (SEPTEMBER 5TH — OCTOBER 8TH)

For the first time in North America, photographs will be shown from Jessica Fulford-Dobson’s time spent with the young participants of Sakeistan, an NGO founded in 2009 to provide kids with a safe place to skateboard and access to education in Afghanistan, Cambodia, and South Africa. The result is a series of photographs showing girls skateboarding that is simple in construction, but is also entirely moving, uplifting, and empowering. It’s a celebration of girls not only being able to undermine gender stereotypes, but also enjoy being children. The photographs will be up in a free exhibition at Aga Kahn Park for the month, and in a time when chaos is the norm, I highly recommend taking in something like this that is just inherently positive.

Learn more here.

PEAK VELOCITY (SEPTEMBER 6TH — OCTOBER 6TH)

Phil Irish’s upcoming exhibition at the Lonsdale Gallery will feature dynamic paintings of mountain peaks and breaking sunlight over aluminum structures built by the artist. The clear conflict between natural wonder and industrial development exemplifies Irish’s time spent in Western Canada, trying to reconcile the overwhelming presence of the Rocky Mountains with the existence of the Athabasca Oil Sands. In the place where the natural and unnatural meet, Irish created these beautiful and unusual works as a way for viewers to examine how we have caused these two very different forces to coexist in our world.

Learn more here.

THE LAST DAYS OF VACATION (SEPTEMBER 7TH — 30TH)

Renowned Italian photographer and artist Paolo Ventura will have his first solo Canadian exhibition at the Nicholas Metivier Gallery this month. Ventura’s gorgeous photographers are a fascinating mix between the real and the surreal, hiring actors to fill his shots and hand-painting the photographs to either add to the sets or superimpose onto the human figures. Ventura employs elements from both Italian surrealism and 20th-Century Neorealism. The effect is otherworldly and transportive. An hour spent with Ventura’s photographs is an hour spent in a different universe.

Learn more here.

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